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Full text of "This is Florida Presbyterian College, 1967-68"

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;^ f^LORIDA PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 

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With its third Commencement— the graduation 
of the Class of 1966— Florida Presbyterian College 
took the final step toward evaluation of its 
progress in meeting the requirements for accredi- 
tatio7i by the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools. The College received 
candidate status in 1964. 

The excellence of its academic staridards was 
recognized by the Associatio7i of American Col- 
leges in January, 1965, when it elected the College 
to associate membership— the first time in history 
a nonaccredited college has been so honored. 

Florida Presbyterian College is independent 
and church related. Its enrolhnent is ope7i to 
qualified men and women of all faiths— and more 
than a score of denominations are represented in 
the student body. The administration, faculty 
and students comprise a Liberal Arts community 
dedicated to the study of our changing world. 

This is the purpose of Florida Presbyterian 
College: To impart to her students, agaiitst a 
background of Christian faith, a knowledge of 
men, the imiverse in luhich they live, the rela- 
tionship between the two, and the relationship 
of both to the Creator. 



Contents 

President's message 2 

This is our college 3-17 

Basic curriculum 18 

Majors offered 20 

Requirements for degrees 20 

Grades and their meaning 21 

Campus life and honor system 21 

Counseling 22 

Religious life 23 

Admissions 28 

Information for transfers 29 

Costs 30 

Board of Trustees 31 

Board of Counselors 32 

Administration 33 

Faculty 35 

Courses of instruction 41 

Core Courses 43 

Reading 44 

Humanities 44 

History and Social Sciences 55 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences .... 63 

East Asia Areas Studies 69 

Calendar of Events 1967-68 71 

Scholarships 72 

Loans 73 

Resume 74 



BULLETIN OF FLORIDA PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 



Vol. IX, No. 1 September, 19G6, Published Monthly except August 

St. Petersburg, Florida 33733. Second Class Postage paid at St. Petersburg, Florida 

This bulletin of Florida Presbyterian College contains general information 
about the College. For further information write Director of Admissions. 



Litho By St. Petersburg Printing Company, Inc. 



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This is 

FLORIDA 

PRESBYTERIAN 

COLLEGE 

A Four Year, Coeducational 
Liberal Arts College 



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Freedom of 
Understanding 



This is a new age. No other group of college 
students has faced a future so bright with promise 
and opportunity and so challenging to man's in- 
tellectual and moral nature as the present gen- 
eration. This catalogue, which presents the aims, 
ways, and means of Florida Presbyterian College, 
is designed to tell of a way of life in which 
college-aged youth may prepare themselves 
excellently for their dynamic futures. 

Sttidents as scholars are concerned with truth: 
its understanding, presentation, augmentation, 
critical analysis, and transmission. Our age is 
witnessing not only an explosion of poptdation 
but an explosion of knowledge. Florida Presby- 
terian College offers its students unlimited 
opportunity to confront truth through a library 
of carefully selected vohnnes, fully equipped 
science and language laboratories, an exciting 
curriculum that emphasizes interdisciplinary and 
independent studies, and, most important, an 
exceptionally well-qualified faculty. Florida 
Presl)yterian College's way of life is a searching 
experience, leading the student from the 
limitations of a little knowledge to the limitless 
freedom of understanding. 

Students, as Americans, are free people; and 
only among free people can the learning process 
go on. In such an atmosphere there is no sin in 
having a new idea and no safety in giving simply 
lip service to an old idea. Education is a refining 




process through which the mind and spirit are 
at one and the same time liberated and captured. 
The way of life of Florida Presbyterian College 
is an experience of growth leading the student 
from the confusions of youth to the commitments 
of maturity. 

Man is more than body and mind. "The 
heart, too, must be fed." A college student's 
understanding of truth must be complete. God 
cannot be "the forgotten factor" in man's search. 
He made man free. Our use of freedom in our 
search for truth must be related to an awareness 
of God and a concern for the good. The way of 
life of Florida Presbyterian College is a "becom- 
ing" experience, leading the student through 
questions and debates to bring adequate moral 
judgments to the issues of life. 

I invite young people, their parents, coun- 
selors, and our friends to consider sincerely the 
program illustrated herein and welcome any 
qualified student to life in our community. 



uXfitr^^.fcL^ 



William H. 
President 



Kadel 



To Open Horizons 



Liberal arts, so called because their study 
liberates men and lits them lor a place in a Tree 
society, means opened horizons. The central 
concern ol Florida Presbyterian College is to 
lead her students to deeper insight, comprehen- 
sion, and imderstanding ol men, oi our imiverse, 
and ol' the relations between the two. Through 
superior students, experimentation and Christian 
connnunity, Florida Presbyterian College plants 
in her students a desire lor kno^vledge and a love 
ol ^\•isdom and invites them to the satislactions 
^\•hich the persistent pursuit ol such ideals may 
allord. 



Outstanding Students 



Florida Presbvierian College actively seeks 
oiitsiaiuliiig students. Trusting that our leaders 
tomorrow are the better students of today, 
Florida Presbvterian College trains them to be 
good leaders and to seek and to assiuiie leader- 
ship. Certain kinds ol turricidimi and methods 
ol teaching are possible and appropriate only 
with outstanding students. \Vhile Florida 
Presbvterian College has tew rigid entrance 
recjuirements, it expet ts ol her prospective 
stiulents considerable attainment in academic 
subjects. In addition to scholarly achievement, 
students should display unusual breadth of inter- 
est and excellence of character conducive to the 
orderly transition from secondary school to 
college. Young men and women must be eager 
to learn to grow physicallv, intellectually, and 
spiritually. Above all, they must be ready to 
accept much of the responsibility for their own 
learning. Student enrollment reached 850 in 
1966. The freshman class of 1966-67 had students 
from 26 states and five foreign countries. 




Living Research 



Florida Pk-sIj\ tci ian (iollege exists lo pro\e 
to the world that the minimum or average need 
not jje the norm in education (or thinking) and 
lo test the proposition that education can be 
both liberal and (Christian. It adopts experi- 
mental attitudes in attempting to reach its goals 
iluough unique but (arelully considered means. 

We are engaged in living research in higher 

etiucation, not merely in developing something 
we already have. The general direction of our 
research is to discover how students can incjst 
skillfully learn to make evaluations. Description 
and analysis are not sufficient, we believe, fc^r 
moral eclucation. 'Fhey cannot be dispensed 
with; they are necessary in the search for truth. 
But the search for truth cannot stop with them. 
Truth recjuires judgment and chf)ice based upon 



moral presuppositions. The formulations of 
standards of judgment as a conscious intellectual 
activity and the habitual judgment of such 
standards are an indispensable part of education. 
We do not presume that Florida Presbyterian 
College is the first college to assume the necessity 
of a moral end of education, but we are experi- 
mental in trying to find out how best such an 
end can be realized. 



Motivation 

Florida I'resl)yterian (College thus has a deep 
concern for its students. It seeks tcj stimulate 
growth — the student's realization of individual 
potential — and enccju rages individual attain- 
ment. With the fundamental aim of the College 
conmumity to make students aware of the serious- 
ness of their vocation, students, throughout their 
undergraduate careers, exercise their powers of 
decision on the basis of informed and thoughtful 
judgment ccjnsciously j)ursued. 



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A Christian Coiiiniunity 

In still another way we are probably more 
experimental than in any other: we are trying 
to lind out what a Christian College is! Those 
who have studied the idea longest and hardest 
agree that people in general have no clear-cut 
idea of what a Christian college is or should be 
and that disagreement is to be expected. Still 
we are all united in believing that there should 
be a college in which the presuppositions are 
avowedly Christian. 

Truth, freedom and Christianity have inevit- 
able connections whether in the search, the 
heritage or the government of a Christian college. 
And we have a vision of a Christian community 
which is not monastic in separating dedicated 
persons from the world but which prepares 
dedicated people to go back into the world and 
witness through the exercise of their intellect. 



This witness, we pray, will prove to the world 
that a Christian education best fits people for 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for 
others. 

A private, coeducational, liberal arts college, 
founded and maintained by the Presbyterian 
Churches, both U.S. and U. P. U.S. A. acting co- 
operatively, Florida Presbyterian College 
acknowleclges as primary in the search for truth 
a knowledge of Cod and of ourselves as revealed 
in Jesus Christ. The College examines and 
nurtures beliefs and recognizes faith as a probing 
and vitalizing force. 

Dedicated to the inspiration of a strong sense 
of Christian obligation for involvement and 
leadership in local and global events, the College 
is equally dedicated to the proposition that its 
doors are open to qualified students of all faiths. 




Prospective students, regardless ol major field 
of study and plans beyond the luidergraduate 
years, will find in Florida Presbyterian College 
educational experiences basic to lasting satisfac- 
tion, personal integration and social usefulness. 
The program of liberal arts, complete in itself, 
is eminently practical, regardless of a student's 
intended vocation or avocation. In addition, 
the College provides specific pre-professional 
training for the ministry, medicine, law, 
education, business and graduate work in 
specialized fields. 

In short, Florida Presbyterian College aims 
to provide life-long attitudes of always seeking 
deeper, fuller comprehension, of always seeking 
the whole view, and of always following coin^ses 
of action to extend capabilities and responsibili- 
ties for personal and community betterment. 



Learning is Personal 



Florida Prcbl)) lerian College is a unified 
academic community in which each member's 
recognition and security depend on his freedom 
to piusiie s( holar'^liip and to associate with others. 
Here learning is personal and widely varied 
l)ccause of the realization that knowledge comes 
Irom others of diltering as well as similar back- 
grounds and pursuits. We employ both conven- 
tional and imconventional methods in the search 
hir tiuih to provide insights and skills which 
tvain and excite our students' intellects and 
emotions l<n' creative and imaginative expression. 

In guiding our students' development, we 
afford them innumeral^lc opportunities to learn 
emotional independence, the necessity for indi- 
\idual tjiie^iioning, and the right and duty of 
personal judgment. 'Fhus, Florida Presbyterian 
College (herishes freedom of thought. For its 
entire academic community — students, faculty, 
staff — the Cfjllege insists upon respect for human 
ilignity and individual moral responsibility sup- 
ported by the belief that humanity was created 
for one great cooperation. Thus the College 
confronts students with the conflicts of cultures, 
affording them an opportunity to intensify their 
own search for meaningful and applicable values. 
Students learn to arrive at new and broader un- 
derstandings of themselves and their studies in 
relation to culture, creation and the ultimate. 





A Fresh Start 



Founded in the tradition of the great American 
liberal arts schools, Florida Presbyterian College 
has been singularly blessed Iroin its beginning. 
The founders, trustees, stall and faculty liave 
together pursued a policy ol experimentation. 
This jjolicy has been not to cast out what has 
proved successful in echuation of the highest 
tjuality, but rather with a Ircsh stait to de\clop 
and adopt new approadies, programs, facilities 
and procediues. .\lready the cmricuhnn and the 
permanent campus, planned by architects and 
educators, have captured widespread attention 
and enthusiasm among those concerned with 
meeting the vastly increasing demands for higher 
education in the I'nited States for superior 
students. 

To carry out a college pioLi,i;iiii ol the first 
order efficientlv and at a miinnuim ( osi, students 
themselves undertake indcpendcni learning 
timing their loin- vears. The piogiaiii generates 



independence of thinking and study to produce 
fuller understanding, to inspire personal initia- 
tive and to develop acceptance of responsibility. 
The entire program emphasizes independent 
study, under faculty guidance and review, and 
elicits and maintains individual responsiiiility 
through specific means. 



Core Courses 

To promote a community of learners and to 
demonstrate the interrelatetlness of knowledge, 
Florida Presbyterian College asks every student 
to take at least one course which all students in 
his year are taking. These are the Core courses 
taught co-operatively ijy professors of art, biology, 
economics, history, physics, political science, psy- 
chology, religion and sociology. In these, students 
pursue with the group and cjn their own a critical 
luiderstanding of the major attempts of man to 
interpret his purpose and tfj fjrgani/e his experi- 
ence through the analytic and historic study of 
works and institiuions. 



Independent SUidy 

Proficiency rather than fulfilhiient of course 
requirements is the measure of accomplishment 
and admission to advanced studies. Thus per- 
formance (e.g., on placement tests) rather than 
credit previously earned admits students to ad- 
vanced work in the Core courses, languages, 
sciences and mathematics and determines 
progress toward a degree. In many areas, students 
can work independently, preparing themselves 
for advanced standfng, doing research and writ- 
ing papers, and receive recognition for their 
work without attending lectures and classes. 
Hence a student may accelerate his education 
during the school year and the summer months 
at home according to his capabilities and secure 
the full recognition for work done independently 
which normally is certified by course credits. 



Studies Abroad 

To increase in our students opportunities for 
self-directed study and a sense of world com- 
munity, Florida Piesbyterian College arranges 
studies abroad during the Winter Term, the 
summer and the junior year. Students travel in 
groups and singly with projects for study planned 
in advance. The College co-operates with other 
schools here and abroad, tests the language pro- 
ficiency of students for the project undertaken, 
evaluates their accomplishments upon their 
return to the campus and awards equivalent 
credit. As a member of the Associated Mid- 
Florida Colleges, Florida Presbyterian encourages 
its students to participate in a Junior Year 
Abroad Program in France, Germany and Spain. 



Size of Classes 



Florida Presbyterian College has few middle- 
sized classes. They are either large enough to 
encourage independent work and the exchange 
of ideas within the whole community or small 
enough to permit discussions in w^hich learners 
(that is, both teacher and students) explore, 
debate and form conclusions together. Both 
large and small groups place increasing responsi- 
bility on the student and give him two different 
kinds of experience in learning. The large course 
contributes to the idea of community by assem- 
bling all students of a given year for lectures, 
panels, demonstrations, movies and concerts and 
by providing small groups where students test 
their personal reactions against those of their 
fellows in a free forum. The ratio of faculty to 
students is approximately 1:14. Student enroll- 
ment reached 850 in 1967. 





10 





Winter Term 



The Winter Term is ;i special lour-vveek 
period ot independent study lor all undergratl- 
iiates. It conies between the iall semester, which 
begins early in September, and the spring semes- 
ter, which begins early in February. With 
examinations for the Iall semester over before 
the Christmas holidays, January is free for in- 
tensive stuciy. 

Designed to develop the qualities of self- 
cHscipline in pursuits reqiuring the student to 
be the prime explorer, the Winter Term asks 
him to work without the customary routine of 
classroom and lecture hall on a single problem 
growing out of his other studies and to present 
his findings in final form. With guidance he 
chooses and limits his sidjject, gathers material, 
organizes it and presents it as a paper, a short 
story, a painting, a piece of laboratory apparatus. 

During this special semester, each professor 
directs the activities of about fifteen students. 
A student selects a professor to work under; 
sometimes the group works co-operatively on 
topics or problems announced in advance, and 
sometimes they work separately. Throughout the 
four weeks, the professor is available for con- 
sultation and guidance. 

This intensive, independent study supple- 
ments the extensive work of the courses and thus 
affords unusual opportunity for the student 
dining each of his four years to engage in 
extentled, creative work not normally afforded in 
traditional luidergraduate curricidums. Tlnough 
the Winter Term at Florida Presbyterian College, 
the student not only works on his own to master 
a limited subject but may have the benefit of 
step-by-step evaluation of his work. 

Some of these projects are conducted in 
foreign countries. 



^^i^j^y.'Mtl^ijairrj^. 



11 




During his senior year, every student takes 
a seminar in his major field. Upon recommenda- 
tion of their major professors, seniors may elect 
to pursue an independent program of study and 
research in addition to or in lieu of the senior 
seminar. They present the results of their work 
in thesis. Ordinarily, thesis research begins in 
the first semester of the senior year and extends 
throughout the second semester. A student may 
begin thesis work in the junior year. 



Priniatp Laboratorv 

Some of the most unusual research being 
conducted anywhere in the world is being carried 
out in the primate laboratory of Florida Presby- 
terian College. 

There 28 rhesus monkeys are being tested 
under the direction of Dr. Wilhelm F. Anger- 
meier, associate professor of psychology, in a 
project sponsored by the Office of Aerospace 
Research, Washington, D. C. 

The mental reactions of monkeys and of 
human subjects to situational stimuli are being 
collected and analyzed through these laboratory 
experiments to determine adaptability to known 
and unknown environments. 



12 



The Lan«:iiage Laboratory 



A primary objective of studying a modern 
foreign language is learning to speak and under- 
stand it and the culture it conveys. The language 
laboratory facilitates this aspect of learning 
through aural-oral practice that the conventional 
classroom does not provide. The laboratory at 
Florida Presbyterian College is of the newest 
design. It operates thirty-five positions by remote 
control so that the student can work independ- 
ently or as a member of a class. By merely dialing 
an appropriate number, the student can hear an 
instructional tape, record his own responses, and 
play it back for comparison and corrections. As 
many as a hundred different tapes are available 
to the student at any time. Languages offered 
are Chinese, French, German, Russian, Spanish, 
Latin and Greek. 



The Writing Laboratory 



Since academic success depends in great 
measure upon the written word, Florida Pres- 
byterian College emphasizes a high degree of 
proficiency in writing, both in the selection of 
its students and in determining their progress. 
The College looks for students who do not re- 
quire training in writing in a formal course of 
composition. It makes heavy demands upon 
them in their writing. Students learn to expect 
criticism from all their professors on their written 
work and help in planning papers and achieving 
effective style. In addition some staff members 
are available to help students overcome indi- 
vidual weaknesses. The writing laboratory 
enables students to form efficient procedures by 
providing a workshop for writing with a faculty 
consultant and appropriate reference books. 



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The Reading Laboratory 



The College Reading Laboratory is well 
equipped, containing rate pacers, tachistoscopes, 
a controlled reader and a library of reading 
texts. This laboratory provides both group work 
and attention to individual needs. With some 
suggestions and guidance from the instructor, 
the student works as independently as possible. 
A proficiency test is administered to all freshmen 
and transfer students. On the basis of this and 
other tests they learn whether they shotdd work 
on special reading skills, or whether, though their 
reading is above average, they can profit by 
increasing their rate. Throughout their four 
years students can receive help in achieving 
efficient reading rates necessary to enable them 
to master the heavy reading assignments of our 
program. 



^^l'. 



The Science Laboratories 

A student in the natural sciences has oppor- 
tunity to undertake laboratory practice and 
research. Manual exercises and routine experi- 
ments (which are not experiments at all but 
repetitions) are minimized. Emphasis is rather 
on the student's acquiring the ability to under- 
stand theory and experimentation, exploring the 
appropriateness of methods and evaluating 
design and techniques. The small laboratory 
becomes the place for group discussion and 
provides occasion for exchange of ideas and pro- 
cedures among students. 

Natural and man-made laboratories combine 
to provide varied off-campus scientific study in 
the College's immediate area. The climate allows 
year-round field work in natural laboratories 
such as lakes, bays and land-area communities, 
and students can apply their knowledge of chem- 
istry, physics, and biology to aquatic environ- 
ments under a continuing research program. 
There is also a high concentration of excellently 
staffed laboratories concerned with electronics, 
nuclear physics and chemistry in many private 
and governmental research facilities in the area. 



14 



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V ,\A 




William Liilher Cobb Library 



Because the liberal arts college must be a 
reading college, the library is the center of the 
academic program. 'With oiu' emphasis upon 
independent ^\ork, the library, gilt ot Mr. and 
Mrs. William Luther Cobb ot Tarpon Springs, 
Florida, is the primary instrument in the educa- 
tional process, the storehouse of the information, 
opinions and techniques necessary to a liberal 
education. Through open shelves and collections 
maintained in each dormitory, students have 
easy access to many books. The library not only 
supplies materials for reference, required reading 
and research papers but also compiles bibliogra- 
phies, prepares exhibits and promotes interest 
in reading. 

The initial ten-year goal of the \Villiam 
Luther Cobb Library is 100,000 volumes. At 
present there are 65,000 catalogued volumes on 
the shelves. 



The Studios 



The practice of art and of music flourishes 
in the studios of Florida Presbyterian College. 
Here students may receive professional guidance 
individually or in groups of various sizes, or 
they may pursue independently the mastery of 
techniques. In the art studio a student works 
in many media. In the music studio he may 
study voice or the instrument of his choice. As 
a result of their studio work, students periodically 
offer exhibits of their paintings, prints and 
sculptures and present recitals to the College 
community and friends. In its emphasis upon 
the activities of the studios, the College encour- 
ages its students' personal involvement with the 
materials of the creative and performing arts. 





The Campus . . 




16 



and Campus Life 



Florida Presbyterian College provides a resi- 
tlciuiai student lite. Most of its undergraduates 
li\e on the breeze-swept, bay front campus in 
its air conditioned buildings. 

The voung men and women in residence 
learn Ironi their irieiul-. and associates as well 
as their professors. They actjuire iniderstanding, 
leadership aiul tolerance and they practice free, 
demotratic choice of action. The non-resident 
student-, participate in all campus functions. 

They are part of a liberal arts, academic 
community which occupies 48 buildings on 285 
acres studded ^\ith palm, pine and live oak trees 
on the east shore of Boca Ciega Bay, just off 
the Gulf of Mexico. Just a mile to the south is 
the entrance to the famous Sunshine Skyway 
crossing the mouth of Tampa Bay. 

The grounds and buildings were valued at 
SI 1,400,000 in 1966, with more buildings sched- 
uled for completion in 1967. Expenditures total- 
ing 525,000,000 by the end of the next decade 
are charted. 

Present buildings include six dormitory com- 
plexes capable of housing 825 students and three 
resident counselors. 

The community center of the campus is the 
College Union: it serves all members of the Col- 
lege family— students, faculty, alimmi and guests. 
It includes a ballroom, bowling lanes, a snack 
bar, a billiard room and offices for the student 
publicatifjns. .More than a group of buildings, 
the College L'nion is an organization and a pro- 
gram. It is the hub aroimd which revolves the 
social life of the campus. All students auto- 
matically receive membership in the College 
I 11 ion. 

The intellectual hub of the College is the 
William Luther Cobb Library, gift of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cobb of Tarpon Springs, Fla. It already 
contains 65,000 of the 100,000 volumes for w'hich 
it is designed. 

Ihc Dendy - .Mc.Xair Teaching .\utliioi iuui 
and the F. Page Seibert Humanities Building 
are units of the Humanities Complex. The 
former, donated by First Presbyterian (>hurch 
of Orlando, is named for two former ministers 
ot that church; the latter was named for the 
Daytona Beach philanthropist. The Forrer 
Language Center, including one of the most 



modern teaching laboratories in the world, is 
the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. Forrer of 
Lakeland. 

The Helen and Cecil Webb Health Center, 
a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Webb of Tampa, pro- 
vides office and equijjment for medical care for 
College community. The administration build- 
ing is named for its donors, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam W. LIpham of St. Petersburg Beach. 

The Science Complex has three wings— a 
teaching auditorium, a biology laboratory build- 
ing and a chemistry and physics laboratory 
building. 

The Robert W. and Helen Roberts Music 
Building, named in honor of Mrs. Roberts and 
her late husband, provides a modern facility for 
the study and practice of music. 

Completion of the Social Sciences Complex 
and the Ben Hill Griffin Chapel is expected in 
1967. 

Athletic facilities include an AAU swimming 
pool, baseball diamond, tennis courts and prac- 
tice golf links. All students are encouraged to 
use these facilities. 




The Basic Four-Year Course 



FRESHMAN 
Fall 


Core Course 


Language 


Mathematics 
or Logic 


Elective 


Physical 
Edtication 


Winter 


Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Language 


Mathematics 
or Logic 


Elective 


Physical 
Education 



SOPHOMORE 
Fall 


Core Course 


Core Science 


Language 


Two 
Electives 


Physical 
Education 


Winter 


Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Core Science 


Language 


Two 
Electives 


Physical 
Education 



JUNIOR 
Fall 


Core Course 


Core Science 


Two Coiuses 
in Major 


Elective 


Winter 


Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Core Science 


Two Courses 
in Major 


Elective 



SENIOR 
Fall 


Core Course 


Two Courses in Major 


Two Electives 


Winter 


Inde])endent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Two Courses in Major 


Two Electives 



The Ciirriculuin 



The College accepts and endorses the policy 
general in American education that a liberal 
arts program includes studies in the three 
piincipal divisions. Vet it does not accept the 
standard procedure ot prescribing a certain nimi- 
ber ot courses in other than the major depart- 
ments because it tends to an accumulation of 
courses not in any deep sense relevant to the 
ini(.'llij4cnt development of the particular student 
III lo hi-, major course of study. Accordingly, it 
ha^ established a policy of making the coinse of 
^ludy unified for individual development and 
interests. The College does not specify attention 
to other fields as a given number of courses but 
rather as a plan involving a student's imique 
experiences of pingiammed special readings con- 
nc(ted Aviiji his main interest, of independent 
stiich, (jr oi (jther de\i(cs. I he jninciple opera- 
tive in each case is iliat the plan ol stucl\ be 
(i)herent and ordei 1\ and imt ckliiied as iormal 
( oiuse credits. 

In the formulation of the cmriciilum at 
Florida Presbyterian C>)llege consideration is 
given to major problems and developments in 
higher education. Specifically, these are (1) inter- 
disciplinary study, (2) pre-professional study, 

(3) independent study, (1) cjualiiative assess- 
ment, (5) international dimensions of study, 

(6) the role of basic values in curriculum defini- 
tion and (7) separation within the academic com- 
munity. These are elaborated in a basic cur- 
riculum, the minimum rccjuircd program of the 
College. Students working with their advisers 
build on this basic curriculum adding to it and 
adapting it to their abilities and needs. The 
inter-disciplinary Core course provides a four- 
year liberalizing experience which makes learn- 
ing an involvement and enduring experience. 



The Winter Term exposes every student to 
independent study affording opportunity for 
individual pursuits. In addition uidividual pro- 
ficiencies give students scope and choice in: 

a. Courses in the Major. The several fields 
of major study stipulate various recjuire- 
ments (see Courses of Instruction pp. 12). 
It should be noted that students may begin 
work in their major field as freshmen. 

Majors are offered in: 
Hmnanities— Art, Languages, Literature, 

Music, Philosophy, Religion; 
History and the Sc^cial Sciences— Econom- 
ics and Business Administration, His- 
tory, Political Science, Psychology, Soci- 
ology and Anthropolc:)gy; 
Mathematics and the natural Sciences- 
Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, 
Physics. 
East Asia Studies. 
Students may pursue a divisional or inter- 
divisional major consisting of ten or more 
courses of which six will represent concentration 
in one discipline with the additional courses 
related to this major. 

1). Language. Students must demonstrate 
comjjetence in speaking, reading and writ- 
ing a foreign language and be familiar 
with the cultiue of a country to which 
the language is native. Ccjmpeience sc3me- 
times is achieved through two college years 
of study following two years of high school 
study in the same language. 

c. Mathematics and logic. Students take 
whatever mathematics they are ready for, 
or logic, in either the freshman or sopho- 
more vear. 



19 



d. Other Courses. The curriculum also pro- 
vides specific preparation courses for 
graduate work in specialized fields, in- 
cluding law, medicine and the ministry. 
It also offers a program leading to certi- 
fication to teach at the secondary level in 
most areas in which the College offers 
a major. The student interest in certifica- 
tion should apply to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Advisory Committee no later than 
the first semester of the Junior year. The 
internship is done in the local Pinellas 
Coimty schools. 



m 



Reqiiirenieiits 

for 

Degrees 



In the basic curriculum of 36 courses and 4 
Winter Terms the College looks for: 

a. The experience of the general interdis- 

ciplinary Core courses; 

b. a grasp of the fundamental methods and 
concepts in the humanities, social sciences 
and physical sciences; 

c. proficiency in a language other than the 
student's native language; 

d. competence in a major field of study; 

e. participation and achievements in physical 
education; 

f. achievement in independent study, par- 
ticularly in the Winter Term; 

g. ability to speak and write English effec- 
tively and correctly; 

h. proficiency in reading skills and com- 
prehension. 

Ordinarily two academic years in residence 
are reqtiired for gradtiation. 



Florida Presbyterian College awards the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Arts to students in the 
Humanities and the Social Sciences and Bachelor 
of Science to students in Mathematics and the 
Natural Sciences. It is the intent of the College 
to institute a degree-granting program in Ap- 
plied Science at the earliest possible time. 




20 





^ ^ 



^ 



..^,;t 



Grades and Their Meaning 



The e\al nation (A acadeniic ]jrf)gress at 
Florida Presbyterian College rests on a student's 
resjjonse to educational opportunity rather than 
on the fuUillment oi an arbitrary set ol (ourse 
recjuirenients. Our standards emphasize quality 
rather than (juaniii\, and oiii rewards and 
awards are lor (jutstaniling and creative work. 
To eiiiphasi/e the greater importance ol intel- 
lectual achievement than of grades, Florida 
Presbyterian College uses grades only for ad- 
xisorv purpo'.cs and lor ihc transfer of credit 
In oilier iiiilil 111 ioiis. ill advising sludcnls, we 
iisc ilie grades ot H (^honors), S (saiislac loiA ) 
and r (unsatisfactory). 



Honor System 




SiudenL go\crnmenl is an impoilaiU |)arl of 
(ampus life at the College. Collecti\e adion by 
undergraduates in self-government is vital to 
the College jn-ogram. Basic thereto is the Honor 
System, enforced ijy the students themselves. All 
student activity, academic and social, prcsu]> 
])oses it. Predicated on (Christian values, in its 
practice it contributes to the development of 
emerging, matuie human beings. The College 
encourages a full, satisfying and meaningful 
campus life involving all students. Students 
organize and conduct social functions, publica- 
tions, intramural sports, organizations and 
special events like concerts. 

21 





ounseli] 



X 



The development of concerned and effective 
individuals is reflected in the counseling pro- 
gram. Here the emphasis is on the individual 
student, with his needs, limitations, abilities and 
goals. Through the admissions process, much in- 
formation is obtained on the student. Added to 
it are test results and other material gained dur- 
ing the orientation program. The Counseling 
Center director selects the most appropriate 
faculty adviser, on the basis of this information, 
for each student. During the orientation pro- 
gram the adviser meets with the student and 
plans his course schedule. During the year he 
holds additional conferences to discuss matters 
important to college adjustment and success. 
Faculty advisers form an integral part of the 
counseling program and through his adviser each 
student has access to every special program and 
assistance likely to make college life meaningful 
and enjoyable. 

Each incoming student also has a freshman 
advisory council member (FAC) assigned to him. 
This person aids in the student's social and cam- 

22 



pus adjustment— giving advice and counsel from 
one student to another. 

Professional resident counselors live within 
the women resident complexes and are available 
to help with various problems. Carefully selected 
upperclass male students serve as resident advisers 
in the men's resident complexes. 

A counseling center is available to offer con- 
fidential professional help to students having 
vocational or personal problems. Special group 
sessions are also held on improving study tech- 
niques, major and career planning, pre-marital 
counseling and problems of transition from high 
school to college. 

A Placement Office assists students in obtain- 
ing permanent positions after graduation. It ar- 
ranges visits for representatives of companies and 
agencies seeking personal interviews with our 
students. In addition, the Placement Office 
undertakes special activities to assist those grad- 
uates who seek opportunities in teaching. 

Summer employment and part-time jobs are 
also arranged for interested students. 



Reli*iioiis Life 

The student religious organi/ations ol Florida 
Presbyterian College are eciunenical in nature, 
organized aromid denominational groups ^\•hich 
constitute the Student Christian Association 
(SCA). The SCA seeks to locus the Christian 
faith in the academic community. To this end, 
the SCA constantly strives to accomplish the 
lollowing: 

a persistent, praveriul searcii lor the mean- 
ing of the Christian faith; 
a conscious effort to discern God's pur- 
pose for each j^erson as it relates to his 
vocation: 

a fellowship of the academic community 
joined in conunon worship and the search 
for truth; 

a conscious concern for the life and mis- 
sion of the Ecumenical Church and en- 
couragement of responsible participation 
by its members. 
The basis of the program is worship. Because 
the College stands within the Protestant tradi- 



tion, all aspects of the religious jjrogram are 
voluntary. The chaplain, incli\iclual faculty mem- 
bers, students and the choir, all paiticipate in 
daily wt^ship services conducted for the entiie 
college connnunity. 

Through the planning and (onducling of 
services, students and facidty ha\e the oppor- 
tmiity for a better understanding of the mean- 
ing of worship. During the week, the SCA spon- 
sors small study groups. Faculty members often 
conduct general discussions in the dormitories. 
The SCA program deals with campus, com- 
numity, national and international problems 
from the standpoint of Christian faith. Stu- 
dents also have an opportiuiity to take part in 
regional and national conferences and ecumeni- 
cal work camps. 

The program of Florida Presbyterian College 
seeks to guide the student toward an intelligent 
and responsible Christian connnitment in all 
areas of life. 




^t!<^ 



<> 



mt*« 



.i i ..HP,-iU I I, < , ' il 



Medical Services 



Students have medical attention and services 
throughout the academic year. A registered nurse 
is on hand and a physician available at all times 
on a consulting basis. Those cases that cannot 
be treated in the college's own well-equipped 
infirmary will be referred to either of two excel- 
lent hospitals in the City of St. Petersburg. 




■^, 




Florida Presbyterian College offers a six- 
week's simimer program which ordinarily in- 
cludes courses in Art, Mathematics, Science, 
Government, Reading and Composition, West- 
ern Civilization, French, German, Russian 
and Spanish. 

The stmimer language program provides an 
opportunity for intensive work in understand- 
ing, speaking, reading and writing. Native in- 
formants, language tables and intensive practice 
in conversation are features of this program. 

The Siunmer School period is also used for 
experimentation in course materials and teach- 
ing techniques. Opportimity is available in many 
disciplines for advanced intlependent work. Sum- 
mer School is open to all qualified imdergrad- 
uates, and many courses are open to capable 
high school jtuiiors and seniors. 

The complete recreational facilities of the 
college are available to Summer School students. 



Sports For All 



In udiliiiou to the rcijiiiifcl jjliysital ctliica- 
tion for freshmen and soplioniores, an integral 
part of the curricukmi, the College sponsors an 
extensive program in 17 different team and in- 
dividual sports for both men and women. Nearly 
90 per cent of the student l)ody takes part in 
this program. 

Intercollegiate athletics are entirely under 
the control of the College and organized and 
administered by the Athletic Department. The 
Faculty Athletic Committee supervises all sched- 
ules. It also gives attention to the proper rela- 
tion of athletic activities to the academic ideals 
and objectives of the College. 



llie Intercollegiate .\thletic Program pro- 
vides valuable experience to those students who 
possess superior physical skills and desire- to rep- 
resent the institution in formal competition. The 
sports included in the program are basketball, 
golf, tennis, judo, fencing, ijaseball, swinuning, 
cross country, sailing and track. 

Schedules are arranged with most of the 
Florida colleges and other senior colleges 
throughoiu the South. The annual Suncoasi 
Classic Basketball Tournament, the Awards Din- 
ner and the Spring Sports Day are a few of the 
highlights of the Sports Program. 




Concerts 



The Concert Choir, made up of some 40 
students and its popular-song singing subsidiary, 
The Sandpipers, are establishing an ever-growing 
reputation. They have sung throughout Florida 
and now are extending their tours up the 
Atlantic seaboard. Periodically, College instru- 
mentalists and singers and visiting artists give 
recitals of chamber music and solos on campus. 

The College sponsors an Artist Series. The 
1966-67 program included Bramwell Fletcher, 
the Roger Wagner Chorale and Orchestra, the 
Toronto Symphony, the Paris Chamber Or- 
chestra, Gina Bachauer, and Jose Molina Bailes 
Espanoles. 

In the city, two symphony orchestras, an opera 
group, a woodwind quintet, two concert series 
and a string quartet offer numerous programs. 



Publications 



The Trident is the student newspaper pub- 
lished weekly. Incite is a literary magazine^ 
appearing once or twice a semester. The annual 
FPC Handbook is a publication designed for^ 
new students at the College. A College yearboo 
is published annually by a student staff. 



Societies 

The Social Science Forum, open to students 
majoring or especially interested in Economics, 
History, Political Science, Psychology and Soci- 
ology or Anthropology, seeks to stimulate student 
interest in graduate work and professional 
opportunities, in part through discussions of 
controversial and interdisciplinary materials. 

Foreign Language clubs promote understand- 
ing and appreciation of the language, literature 
and culture of the countries involved. Two 
honorary language societies— Delta Phi Alpha 
(German) and Epsilon Pi Iota (Spanish)— have 
chapters on the campus. 

Science clubs include the Chemistry Club, 
the Biology Club, the Physics Club and Pi Mu 
Epsilon (honorary mathematics). 

26 




Fil 



ni«i 



vvl.-. 



The Student Government Association spon- 
sors a weekly film series. 

Films are chosen for plot, photography, 
direction, acting, technical innovations, humor, 
general entertainment value and topical interest. 

Films in this series are supplemented by pic- 
tures shown by College departments, divisions, 
and the Core program. 



/f^V 



Theatre 

The theatre program at Florida Presbyterian 
College is centered in a Theatre Workshop in 
which all students are invited to participate. 
Performances are scheduled throughout the year: 
major production presented with fidl staging 
and under professional discipline; informal ex- 
periments, readings and exercises coordinated 
with the Core program and other projects. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the contemporary develop- 
ment of the theatre and upon its engagement 
with active intellectual, political, social and re- 
ligious issues. Theatrical production is related 
to the regular academic work in drama, in 
theatre history and aesthetics, and in theatrical 
production. 



Lectures 

The Core curriculum, the academic societies, 
forums and clubs of the College bring guest 
speakers throughout the year. Certain of these 
lectures are designed to meet the need of specific 
groups; others are open to the general public. 
A Faculty Lecture Series is presented each year. 




Fresliiiiaii Adiiiissioii 



Admission to Florida Presbyterian College is 
based upon past academic performance in mathe- 
matics, science, literature, language and social 
studies, achievement on examinations; and 
personal qualifications such as character, special 
talents, range of interest, poise, maturity and 
personal development. The ability which the 



student has to profit from and contribute to 
the learning community is emphasized. Anyone 
deemed undesirable because of his conduct and 
character may be refused admission (or, as a 
student, may be requested to withdraw from the 
College at any time) . 



Procedures For 
Application 

a. The candidate for admission to Florida 
Presbyterian College should initiate his appli- 
cation for admission by directing a request for 
the application form and transcript form to the 
Director of Admissions. 

b. The formal application for admission 
must be completed and returned to the Director 
of Admissions with an application fee of $10. 

(The fee is not refundable.) The applicant must 
request the proper administrative officer of the 
high school from which he is to be graduated 
to send a transcript of his record to the Director 
of Admissions of Florida Presbyterian College. 

c. Applicants must arrange to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test offered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. The results of 
the tests should be submitted to the Director of 
Admissions of the College. It is recommended 
that the applicant take his Scholastic Aptitude 
Test in December of his senior year. Scores from 
the January, March, May, and July dates are 
acceptable; however, the results from the Decem- 
ber testing are preferred. Scholastic Aptitude 
Test scores from a testing in the junior year may 
be used to admit students before the December 
test results are processed. However, all applicants 
are requested to take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test during their senior year. Florida Presby- 
terian College recommends, btit does not require, 
that applicants take the following Achievement 
Tests: Mathematics I or II and English. 

Testing centers throughout the country give 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test at specified times. 
At least six weeks before the date of any of the 
tests, the candidate should apply directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey. The Board sends an 
information booklet giving full details about 
testing centers and the tests available, and will 
mail the test results directly to the colleges 
designated by the applicant. 

28 



Scholastic Aptitude Test 



Registration 
Before 



Registration 
with Penalty 



Until 
Test Given: 



q October 29 November 12 December 3 

H December 10 December 24 January 14 

f\ February 4 February 18 March 4 

^ April 8 April 22 May 6 

; June 10 June 24 July 8 



The applicant for admission to the Freshman 
class must have completed the graduation re- 
quirements and demonstrated academic com- 
petence in a high school or preparatory school 
accredited by a state or regional accrediting 
agency. Even though the academic record will 
not be judged primarily on specific units of 
work, students entering Florida Presbyterian 
College are expected to have, generally: four 
years of English, three years of mathematics, two 
years of language, one year of history and one 
year (preferably two) of science. 

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE 

The Admissions Office of Florida Presby- 
terian College will prepare a file on each 
candidate for admission. This compilation will 
include the original request for an application, 
transcripts from the high school or preparatory 
school, test scores, personal recommendations 
and any other pertinent data submitted by the 
applicant or gathered by the Admissions Office. 

The Admissions Committee of Florida 
Presbyterian College meets at regular intervals 
during the school year. The first of the regular 
meetings takes place in November, and if a 
candidate for admission has completed his formal 
application, including a high school transcript 
which is complete through the junior year and 
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, it is possible for 
the Committee to act upon the application at 



that time. Acceptance by the Committee at this 
time does not mean that the candidate is 
obhgated to attend Florida Presbyterian College. 
^V'hen an application tor admission is sub- 
mitted to the Admissions Committee and action 
has been taken, the Director ot Admissions will 
notity the candidate oi the status ol his applica- 
tion. The candidate may be accepted pending 
successful completion of his senior year, he may 
be denied admission to Florida Presbyterian Col- 
lege, or he may be requested to supply additional 
information which will help the Admissions 
Conunittee make a final decision. Candidates 
^\•ho are for any reason in doubt about the status 
of their application should write directly to the 
Director of Admissions. 

COLLEGE VISITATION 

.\ visit to the Florida Presbyterian College 
campus is highly recommendeci. Please tele- 
phone or write to the Admissions Office for an 
appointment. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 
Courses will be honored at Florida Presby- 
terian College on the basis of scores on the 
Advanced Placement Examination administered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Scores of three, four, and five will automatically 
certify the student in the course covered by the 
examination. Scores of two will be referred to 
the staff of the appropriate discipline for recom- 
mendations concerning possible credit. No credit 
will be allowed for scores of one. 

TR.\NSFER ADMISSION 
A student at another college or university 
wishing to transfer to Florida Presbyterian 
College must complete the recjuirements for 
admission already listed, and submit a transcript 
of his college record with a catalogue and a state- 
ment from the college of his academic standing 
and personal qualifications. 

Transfer applicants ^^■ho have previously 
taken the Scholastic .Aptitude Test may submit 
these scores or arrange to retake this examination. 
If the applicant has not taken the Scholastic 
.\ptitude Test, he must arrange to do so. All 
applicants must submit results of the Scholastic 



Aptitude Test to the Director of Admissions of 
Florida Presbyterian College. 

The transfer of credit from other institutions 
of higher education approved by the Regional 
Accrediting Agency depends upon the corre- 
s]x)ndence of the courses to those offered at 
Florida Presbyterian College and the approval 
of the academic division concerned. Grades below 
C are not acceptable for transfer. 

Students transferring into Florida Presby- 
terian College at the Junior level are expected 
to transfer twenty courses and to take five 
courses each semester during the Jiuiior and 
Senior years. 

SPECIAL ADMISSION 
Some students academically too advanced 
for further high school study or more than 
twenty-one years old, may have the entrance re- 
quirements waived. The Admissions Committee 
considers such cases individually. 

CANDIDATE'S REPLY 

All candidates (including financial aid appli- 
cants) \vill deposit $50 with the Director of 
Admissions by May 1, if admitted prior to that 
date. Applicants admitted after May 1 will be 
expected to make this deposit within two weeks 
after acceptance. This money though not refund- 
able, is applied toward the comprehensive 
charges upon enrollment. 

A medical examination form will be- sent to 
each candidate who has paid the $50 acceptance 
fee. This form should be completed and returned 
to the Director of Admissions before the due 
date which is listed at the top of the form. No 
student will be allowed to register until this form 
is completed and on file. 

ORIENTATION 

All new students, freshmen and transfers, will 
I)e asked to report to the campus on September 
1, 1967, for orientation. The orientation jieriod 
offers a relaxed atnrosphere for meeting with 
college staff, pre-registration, course counseling 
and placement testing. Information about the 
orientation will be mailed on (idy 1, 1967, to all 
ajjplicants who have paid the .$50 acceptance fee. 







Costs 

A college education of high intellectual chal- 
lenge is of lasting value and, like most things of 
value, is costly. Only ignorance is more ex- 
pensive. Private, non-tax supported institutions 
such as Florida Presbyterian College make every 
effort to keep the cost of education down and, 
as a result, the student pays only a portion of 
the actual expenses of his education. The por- 
tions paid by the student are as follows: 
Annual Expenses 
Resident Students 

Comprehensive charges - $2,460 (double room) 
Comprehensive charges - 2,560 (single room) 
Non-Resident Students 

Comprehensive charges - $1,463 

These charges include cost of room and 
board, library, athletic activities, health program, 
laboratory operations, studio facilities, accident 
and health insurance and guidance program. 
Costs include sales taxes. All rooms are air-con- 
ditioned during the months of September, 
October, November, March, April and May. 
The College assumes no liability for utility 
breakdown over which it has no control. .All 
students living on campus are required to deposit 
$5 for room breakage and $1 for key. 

An assessment of $20 has been voted by the 
students to underwrite student-sponsored pro- 
grams, publications and similar student func- 
tions. The Student Government Association has 
authorized the Comptroller's office to collect this 
assessment. 

EXTRA FEES: All new students are charged an 
orientation fee of $12. Students with automobiles must 
pay a $20 annual parking fee. Music. Private in- 
struction in music is approximately $210 per year for 
one hour a week and $105 per year for one-half hour. 

All accounts are due and payable on term 
basis September 1 and January 15. Students may 
make financial arrangements permitting accounts 
to be paid on an installment plan approved by 
the Board of Trustees. All unpaid accounts from 
a prior term must be paid before students will 
be permitted to register for the current term. 
All accounts must be paid by December 1 and 
May I before students will be permitted to take 
final examinations, obtain a transfer of credits, 
or be graduated. Specific financial information 
may be obtained by writing the Comptroller. 

In order to meet changing economic condi- 
tions, the Board of Trustees reserves the right 
to revise charges as conditions may warrant, but 
in no event shall current year's charges be 
adjusted during the academic year. 



Finaiieiii^ Your Education 

Generally, half of tfie total comprehensive 
costs, minus acceptance fees and/or room de- 
posits, is due at entrance in September and the 
remainder by January 15. Upon matriculation, 
the student (and/or his parents) is obligated for 
tuition, fees, room or board for the entire term. 
In addition to the above payment plan, the 
College does sponsor various other plans for pay- 
ment. Information concerning these plans may 
be requested from the Business Office. The 
College also cooperates with insurance and 
tuition-plan companies to make monthly install- 
ment payments possible when necessary. 



Aid to Students 

Financial aid is made available to students 
by the Scholarship Committee based upon finan- i 
cial need, academic performance and potential. 
A student's financial aid is generally provided in 
a package form comprised of scholarship, work | 
aid and loan. Students applying for financial 
aid are automatically considered for any of these 
various forms of aid. 

The College financial aid program emphasizes 
the "self-help" concept. A vast majority of stu- 
dents receiving financial aid will be participating ' 
in the work scholarship program or one of the 
college loan programs. Student loans are good 
business: a college education considerably in- 
creases earning power, most loans require little 
or no interest and some loans may be repaid 
partly in service instead of cash. The College 
has endowed loan funds, state-guaranteed loan 
applications and also participates in the National 
Defense Student Loan Program. 

To provide students with the opportunity to 
earn some of their college expenses, Florida Pres- 
byterian has created many part-time jobs on 
campus. These jobs range from work in the 
cafeteria, buildings, grounds, to faculty offices. 
It is recommended that freshmen not undertake 1 
part-time employment off campus. To complete ' 
the work scholarship program, outstanding up- 
perclassmen are employed as student instructors, 
assisting professors in teaching and research j 
responsibilities. 

Florida Presbyterian College operates with 
the policy that every qualified student should 
be helped to work out financial problems. 
Requests for further information regarding finan- 
cial aid should be directed to the Financial Aid 
Counselor in the Admissions Office. 



30 



Board of Trustees 



Frank M. Hubbard, Chairman 



Clem E. Bininger, Vice Cliairniaii 
William W. Upham, Treasurer 
Gamette J. Stollings, Secreiary 



Mrs. J. M. Douglas, Secretary 

Mrs. Emma H. Conboy, Assistant Secretary 

D. P. McGeachy, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



The Rev. John F. .\nderson, Jr., D.D. 

Executive Secretarv 
Board of Church Extension 
Atlanta, Georgia 
TTie Rev. Robert C. Asmuth 

Pastor, First Presbyterian C^hurch 
Fort Myers, Florida 

Mr. W. D. Bach 

Pensacola. Florida 

Mr. William M. Bateman 

Special Representative 
\\'alston S: Co., Inc. 
Palm Beach, Florida 
The Rev. Clem E. Bininger, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbvterian Church 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

TTie Rev. .\ndrew W. Blackwood, Jr. 

Pastor. First Presbvterian Church 
West Palm Beach, Florida 

Mr. Charles J. Bradshaw 

President, Tropical Chevrolet, Inc. 
.Miami Shores, Florida 

Mr. Cecil V. Butler 

C. \'. Butler Farms, Inc. 
Ha\ana, Florida 

Mr. W. L. Cobb 

President, Cobb Construction Co. 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Mr. Charles Creighton 

President. Creighton Restaurants 
I'ort Lauderdale. Florida 

The Rev. John B. Dickson, D.D. 

Pastor, First Prcsb\terian Church 
Fampa, Florida 

The Rev. J. Stuart Dickson 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Ch. 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Dr. Theodore \. Distler 

President jc Consultant 

Com. for Independent Coll. &.- Uni\. 

Lancaster. Penna. 
Mrs. J. Morton Douglas 

Weirsdale, Florida 
Mr. Jack M. Eckerd 

President, Eckerd Drug Stores 

Cleanvater, Florida 



The Rev. George B. Edgar 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 

Fort Pierce, Florida 
The Rev. Paul M. Edris, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 

Daytona Beach, Florida 
.\rr. J. Colin English 

Chairman of the Board 

F^dinburgh Investment Corp. 

Tallahassee, Florida 
Senator Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. 

President, Ben Hill Griffin. Inc. 

Frostproof, Florida 
Mrs. Sarah Louise Halmi 

Clearwater, Florida 
Mr. Carl A. Hiaasen 

.\ttorney 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
The Rev. Samuel .M. Houck, Th.M. 

Pastor, Ri\iera Presbyterian Cliurih 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. Frank M. Hubbard 

C^hairman of the Board 

Hubbard Construction Co. 

Orlando, Florida 
Dr. W. Monte Johnson 

Executive Director 

IP rs.\ Florida Presbyterian Homes 

Lakeland, Florida 
Mrs. Stephen R. Kirby 

St. Petersburg. Florida 
The Rev. Albert J. Kissling, Th.M. 

Pastor, Riverside Presbyterian Ch. 

Jai ksonville, Florida 
Mr. Oscar R. Krcutz 

( hairman of the Board .<: Presidciu 

first Federal Savings & Loan 

St. Petersburg. Florida 
Mr. PhiUp J. Lee 

\'ice President 

.\tlantic C>)ast Line Railroad 

Jackson\illc, Florida 
The Rev. D. P. McGeachy, Jr., D.D. 

Paslc)r, Peace .Memorial Pres. Church 

Clearwater, Florida 
Mr. Alfred A. McKethan 

President, Hernando State Bank 

Brooksville, Florida 



Mrs. Woodbury Ransom 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 
Mr. Henry F. Renter 

President. Renter R: Bragdon, Inc. 

Pittsburgh, Penna. 
Mr. James C. Robinson 

-Vttorney 

Orlando, Florida 
The Rev. J. Calvin Rose, D.D. 

Pastor, Miami Shores Pres. Church 

Miami, Florida 
Dr. Lindon E. Saline 

Consultant, New Business Plaiuiing 

General Electric Company 

Schenectady, \. Y. 
.Mr. Robert T. Sheen 

President, Milton Roy Com]5any 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. R. McDonald Smith 

General Contractor 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. John Stcrchi 

Vice President, First National Bank 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. Gamette J. Stollings 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. William W. Upham 

I he I'pham Company 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Rol>ert V. Walker 

Exec. \'icc President is: Gen'l. Mgr. 

First Federal Sa\ ings &: Loan 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. James W. Walter 

Chairman of the Board 

Jim \\'alter Corporation 

Fampa, Florida 
.Mr. William H. West 

Realtor 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Mr. John Joseph Williams, Jr. 

.Attorney 

Sarasota, F'lorida 
■Mr. James Y. Wilson 

President 

\Vilson National Life Insurance Co. 

Lake City, Florida 
Mr. Ross E. Wilson 

\\"eirsdalc, Florida 



31 



Board of Counselors 

Mr. Walter G. Allen, Jr., Chairman 
Dr. David P. Sloan, Jr., Vice Chairman 



Mr. Walter G. Allen, Jr., President 
Allen Drug Company 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

The Rev. Hugh F. Ash, D.D., Pastor 
First Presbyterian Church 
DeLand, Fla. 

The Rev. William M. Belk 

Regional Director 

U. S. Synod of Florida 

Orlando, Fla. 

Mr. Earl A. Bowers, Jr., Vice President 
Standard Industrial Com. Co. 
Frankfort, 111. 

Mr. Wendell H. Colson, President 

First National Bank of Satellite Beach 
Satellite Beach, Fla. 

Mr. William A. Emerson, Vice President 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, 

Fenner & Smith, Inc. 
St. I^etersburg, Fla. 

Mr. Eugene G. Fitzgerald 

L. G. Balfour Company 
Birmingham, .\la. 

Mr. Walter P. Fuller 
Broker 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Mr. Walter R. Gall, President 
Gall Silica Mining Co. 
Zephyrhills, Fla. 

Mrs. Charles G. Gambrell 

Vice President and Director 
Belk Stores Services, Inc. 

New York, N. Y. 

Mr. J. Shirley Gracy 

Senior Vice President 
Florida Power Corporation 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Mr. Benjamin E. Griffith, Jr. 

First National Bank 
Orlando, Fla. 

Mr. Robert R. Guthrie 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 



The Rev. J. Wallace Hamilton, D.D., 

Pastor 

Pasadena Community Church 

St. Petersbtirg, Fla. 

The Rev. Malcolm A. Harris, Pastor 
First Presbyterian Church 
Stuart, Fla. 

Mr. Bonnie M. Heath, Owner 
Bonnie Heath Farm 
Ocala, Fla. 

Mr. E. Colin Lindsey 

Executive Vice President 
Belk-Lindsey Stores 
Tampa, Fla. 

Mr. Raymer F. Maguire, Jr. 

Attorney 
Orlando, Fla. 

Mr. Sam H. Mann, Sr. 

Attorney 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Mr. Walter T. Marable 

Assistant to President 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Rev. Charles T. Martz, D.D. 

Synod Executi\e 
Florida U.P. U.S.A. 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Mr. Herbert S. Massey, Vice President 
Pasco Packing Company 
Dade City, Fla. 

Mr. Girard W. Moore, Jr., Manager 
Good body &; Co. 
Miami, Fla. 

Dr. Thomas E. McKell, M.D. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Mr. Ben L. McLaughlin 

Fairfield, Fla. 

Mr. John R. McPherson, Vice President 
Lake Butler Groves, Inc. 
Winter Garden, Fla. 



Mr. Robert Paul, President 
Bob Paul, Inc. 
Winter Haven, Fla. 

Mr. John R. Phillips, President 
Phildel Corp. 
Lakeland, Fla. 

Mr. RoUand R. Ritter, President 
Ritter Finance Company, Inc. 
W'yncote, Pa. 

The Honorable B. K. Roberts 

Justice 

Supreme Court of Florida 

Tallahassee, Fla. 

Dr. Earl J. Serfass 

Milton Roy Company 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Dr. David P. Sloan, Jr., Optometrist 
Leesburg, Fla. 

Mr. E. W. Smith, Jr., President 
Bert Smith Oldsmobile, Inc. 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Mr. John A. Snively, Jr., President 
Snively Groves, Inc. 
Winter Haven, Fla. 

The Rev. John W. Stump, Pastor 
First Presbyterian Church 
Naples, Fla. 

Mr. James C. Thompson 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Mr. James W. Walter, President 
Jim Walter Corp. 
Tampa, Fla. 

Mr. James M. Wellman, President 
Well man-Lord Engineering, Inc. 
Lakeland, Fla. 

Mr. C. G. Whittaker 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mrs. Charles J. Williams 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Miss B. Louise Woodford 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 



32 



Adniinislratioii 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

President 

William Howard Kadcl 

Th.D.. Union Theological Stininarv 
(Richmond, \'a.) 
Administrative Secretory 
Emma H. Conboy 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

Dtan of the College 
John M. Bevan 

Ph.D., Duke Uni\ersity 
Admissions Counselor 
Mariana Bailey 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
Dean of Academic Sen'ices and Director of Overseas Studies 
Clark H. Bouwman 

Ph.D., New School for Social Research 
Head Librarian 
^\■anda Calhoun 

M.A., University of Michigan 
Admissions Counselor 
Mary Jo Carpenter 

.\.B., .\gnes Scott College 
Residence Counselor 
Emma B. Chadwell 

M..\., University of Cincinnati 
Cataloguer 
\\'ai Kin Cheng 

M.S., .Atlanta University 
Acquisition Librarian 
Olga S. Gazdik 

M.S., Florida State University 
Registrar 
Louis C. Guenther 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Director of College Union 
John C. Haworth 

M.A., Northwestern University 
Laboratory Supervisor in Science 
Charles H. Hey 

B..A.., University of Rochester, N. Y. 
Financial Aid Counselor 
Richard D. Huss 

A.B., Florida Presbyterian College 
Director of Placement 
Norman D. Huff 
Dean of Men 
Boyd \V. Johnson 

Ph.D., North Carolina State Univeisity 
Reference Librarian 
Dorothea M. Johnson 

M.A., Florida State University 
Supervisor of Language Laboratory 
Frank H. Keefer 

Associate Director of Presbyterian Guidance Center 
James C. Northrop 

M.A., University of Florida 
Residence Counselor 
Marion K. Royal 

M..\., University of Kentucky 




John M. Bevan 



r . 



Clark H. Boiiwnian 







Louis C. Caieiilher 



Boyd W . Johnson 





William H. Taylor 



William G. Thomson 





Frances M. Whitaker 



Billy O. Wireman 





R. Frank Garner, Jr. 



Director of Admissions 
William H. Taylor 

A.B., DePaiiw University 
Counselor in Presbyterian Guidance Center 
Martha Jo Thomas 

M.S., Florida State University 
Director of Summer School and Continuing Education 
William G. Thomson 

Ett.D., Uni\ersity of Michigan 
Director of Counseling 
J. Thomas West 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Dean of Women 
Frances M. Whitaker 

M.A., Columbia University, Teachers College 
Resident Counselor 
Janet .\nn Yearout 

M.,\., Florida State University 

OFFICE OF THE CHAPLAIN 

Chaplain 

Alan W. Carlsten 

B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary 

MEDICAL STAFF 

Director of Medical Services 
Da\ id L. Jones 

M.D., Western Reserve University 
Charles E. .Aucremann 

M.D., Emory University 
College Nurses 
Katherine C. Conlon, R.N. 
Ethel McGuirk, R.N. 

DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

Vice President, Development 
Billy O. Wireman 

Ed.D., George Peabody College 
Director of Deferred Giving 
Melvin H. Dillin 

Th.B., Princeton Seminary 
Director of Church Relations 
.\lton H. Glasure 

D.D., Temple University 
Director of Public Relations 
Robert B. Stewart 

B.S. Br., University of Florida 
Director of Annual Giving 
Larry M. Hitner 

B.A., Rollins College 

BUSINESS AFFAIRS 

J'ice President, Business Affairs and Business Manager 
R. Frank Garner, Jr. 

B.S., University of Georgia 
Comptroller 
Walter K. Parris, C.P.A. 

.\..\.B., University of Florida 
Assistaiit Business Manager 
B. Dudley Jervey 

M.B.,\., University of Georgia 
Government Relations and Campus Expansion 
Roger D. Samuel, A. LA. 

B.Arch., Kansas State University 
Manager, Purchasing 
Charles F. Gibbs 

A.B., New York University 
Manager, College Store 
Leonard G. Truitt 
Supeniisor, Data Processing Center 
Dorothea M. .\shburn 



Heartbeat of a Colleire 



In no other area was so much painstaking 
care and concern evidenced at Floritia Presby- 
terian College as in the selection ot its faculty 
—the heartbeat ot any such institution. Regard- 
less of status or tenure, every facultv member 
finally selected combines scholarship and teach- 
ing to an extraordinary degree. 

The criteria, for acceptance, as set iortli bv 
the Board of Trustees, call for a teacher with 
depth and command in his field of specializa- 
tion and a breadth of cultural background en- 
abling him to relate his own discipline to the 



toialitv of experience; who demonstrates per- 
sonal and professional competence and growth 
through research, publication and jnoiessional 
participation: who inspires students with his 
respect for his profession by his ability, his char- 
acter and his conduct; who has the ability him- 
self to think creatively and objectively anil to 
inspire his students to do likewise; who extends 
himself to his students in service, to his colleagues 
in co-operation and to his connmniity in con- 
cern; and finally, whose character the students 
will want to emidate. 




7 



I ^ 



TheFaeiilty 

William Howard Kadel 

A.B., Gettysburg College; 

S.T.B., S.T.M., Western Theological Seminary 

Th. D., Union Theological Seminary, Virginia 

D.D., Davidson College 

President 

John M. Bevan 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall; 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 
Dean of College 



Core Course 



Dudley E. South 

A.B.' ^Vooster College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

E. Ashby Johnson 

A.B., Presbvterian College, South Carolina; 

B.D., Th.Ai., Th.D., Union Theological 

Seminary, Virginia 

Professor of Religion; Director of the Core 

Program 

Tennyson P. Chang 

A.B., University of Southern California; 
M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Professor of Asian Studies 

Marie S. Shao 

B.A., Greensboro College; 

M.A., Columbia University, Teachers College 

Instructor in Chinese 




35 




Albert Howard Carter 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Chairman, Division of Humanities 
Professor of EngHsh and Humanities 

James O. Black. 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University ot Arkansas 
Associate Professor of Literature 

James R. Carlson 

A.B., Hamhne University; 
M.A., University of Minnesota 
Associate Professor of Drama 

Alan W. Carlsten 

B.S., University of Oklahoma; 

B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary 

Professor of Religion 

J. Stanley Chesnut 

A.B., University of Tulsa; 
B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 
Associate Professor of Religion 
(on leave during 1966-67) 




Fred C. Covey, Jr. 

B.A., M.A., University of Texas 
Assistant Professor of German 

James G. Crane 

A.B., Albion College; 
M.A., Iowa State University; 
M.F.A., Michigan State University 
Associate Professor of Art 




Diana Yvonne Delgado 

A.B., University of South Florida; 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Robert Detweiler 

B.A., Goshen College; 
B.D., Goshen Biblical Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida 
Assistant Professor of Literature 

Sidney E. Disher, Jr. 

B.A., Wake Forest College; 
M.A., Rice University 
Instructor in German 

Frank M. Figueroa 

B.S., Seton Hall University; 

M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University, Teachers 

College 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Henry E. Genz 

A.B., Emory University; 
M.A., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., Western Reserve University 
Professor of French 



36 



^4^0' 





Rejaiie Poulin Genz 

A.B., Sillery College, Quebec City; 
Licence es lettres Laval University; 
Ph.D., Laval University 
Visiting Associate Professor ot French 

Robert J. Gould 

B.Mus., ALA., University ol Oregon 
Associate Professor of Music 

Robert Hall 

A.B., Wofford College; 

M.A., LTniversity of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor ol Frcndi 

Robert O. Hodgell 

B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin 
Artist in Residence 

Keith W. Irwin 

A.B., Cornell College; 

B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 

John H. Jacobson 

A.B., S^varthmore College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 

E. Ashby Johnson 

A.B., Presbyterian College, South Carolina; 
B.D., Th.M., Th.D., Union Theological 
Seminary, Virginia 
Professor of Religion 

Kenneth E. Keeton 

A.B., Georgetown College, Kentucky; 
M.A., Lhiiversity of Kentucky; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Associate Professor of German 

J. Peter Meinke 

A.B., Hamilton College; 
M.A., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., LJniversity of Minnesota 
Assistant Professor of Literature 

Peter A. Pav 

B.A., Knox College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Margaret R. Rifig 

A.B., Florida Slate L'niversity; 
M.A., Prcsljyterian School of Christian 
Education, Richmond, Virginia 
Assistant Professor of Art 

John R. Satterfield 

A.B., M.M., M.A., Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina 

Professor of Music 



37 



SATTERFIELD 



Hans-Joachim Schacht 

L.L.B., University of Gottingen; 
M.A., Florida State University 
Assistant Professor of German 
(on leave during 1966-67) 

Julia Florence Sherbourne 

A.B., Taylor University; 

M.A., University of Michigan 

Associate Professor of English and Reading 

Ted J. Solomon 

B.A., Macalester College; 

S.T.B., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Assistant Professor of Religion 

William G. Thomson 

A.B., Olivet College; 
M.A., Cornell University; 
Ed.D., University of Michigan 
Associate Professor Classics 

Pedro N. Trakas 

A.B., Wofford College; 

M.A., University of Mexico; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of Spanish and Director of Language 

Laboratory 

William E. Waters 

A.B., University of North Carolina; 
M.Ed., William and Mary 
Associate Professor of Music 

Frederic R. White 

A.B., M.A., Oberlin College; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Professor of Classical and Comparative 
Literature 

Daniel A. Zaret 

Ph.D., University of Moscow 
Professor of Russian 








The Division of History and 
The Social Sciences 



William C. Wilbur, Jr. 

A.B., Washington and Lee; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

Chairman, Division of History and Social 

Sciences 

Professor of History 

Wilhelm F. Angermeier 

M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Professor of Psychology 



38 



^Mfin 





BREDENBERG 



John M. Bevan 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall; 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 
Professor of Psychology 

Clark H. Bouwman 

A.B., Kalamazoo College; 

B.S., Western Michigan University; 

M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Professor of Sociology 

Richard R. Bredenberg 

A.B., Dartmouth College; 

B.S., Union Theological Seminary, Ne\s' York; 

S.T.M., Oberlin College; 

Ph.D., New York University 

Associate Professor of Education 

Burr C. Brundage 

A.B., Amherst College; 

Ph.D., Oriental Institute, University of Chicago 

Professor of History 

Dudley E. DeGroot 

B.A., University of West Virginia; 
M.A., University of New Mexico; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Professor of Anthropology and Sociology' 

James R. Harley 

B.S., Georgia Teachers College; 
M.Ed., George Peabody College 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
Director of Athletics 



Douglas L. Heerema 

B.A., Central University of Iowa; 
M.A., Ph.D., Stale University of Iowa 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

Eniil Kauder 

Ph.D., University oi Berlin 
Professor of Economics 

William A. Koelsch 

Sc.B., Bucknell University; 
A.M., Clark University; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Assistant Professor of History 

Joe F. Lowe 

A.B., Mercer University; 

M.A., Peabody College 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Edward B. McLean 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Anne A. Murphy 

A.B., The College of Wooster; 
B.D., Yale Divinity School; 
Ph.D. University of North Carolina 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 

William H. Parsons 

A.B., Grinnell College; 
A.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 
Assistant Professor of History 




39 




Otis H. Shao 

A.B., St. John's University, Shanghai; 
M.A., University of Colorado; 
Ph.D., Brown University 
Professor of Political Science 

Charles D. Smith 

A.B., Swarthmore College 
Associate Professor of Economics 

Douglas S. Snyder 

A. B., Iowa State University; 
M.S., Purdue University; 
Ph.D., University of Washington 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Edward I. Stevens 

A. B. Davidson College; 
B.D., Harvard Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Henri Ann Taylor 

A.B., Howard College; 

M.A., University of Alabama 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

J. Thomas West 

B.S., Davidson College; 
M.A., University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

Billy O. Wireman 

A.B., Georgetown College; 
M.A., University of Kentucky; 
Ed.D., Peabody College 
Associate Professor of Education 



Division of Mathematics and 
The Natural Sciences 



Irving G. Foster 

B.S., Virginia Military Institute; 
Ph.M., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Chairman, Division of Mathematics and the 
Natural Sciences 
Professor of Physics 
(On leave during 1966-67) 

Wilbur F. Block 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 
Assistant Professor of Physics 



John C. Ferguson 

A.B., Duke University; 

M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Philip R. Ferguson 

A.B., M.A., Indiana University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Leland D. Graber 

A.B., Wheaton College; 
M.A., University of Minnesota; 
Ph.D., Iowa State University 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Paul J. Haigh 

A.B., M.A., Miami University; 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
Associate Professor of Physics 

Robert J. Hatala 

B.S., Juanita College; 
Ph.D., Yale University 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Billv H. Maddox 

B'S., Troy State College; 
M.Ed., ETniversity of Florida; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Robert C. Meacham 

A.B., Southwestern at Memphis; 
ScM., Ph.D., Brown University 
Professor of Mathematics 

Richard W. Neithamer 

B.S., Allegheny College; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

George K. Reid 

B.S., Presbyterian College, South Carolina; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 
Professor of Biology 

Richard A. Rhodes II 

A.B., Bowdoin College; 
M.S., Yale University; 
Ph.D., Brown University 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

William B. Roess 

B.A., Blackburn College; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

Robert G. Van Meter 

B.S., Geneva College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Duke University 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 



40 




COURSES 
OF 
INSTRUCTION 




<4(t^ 



"^^i 



% 




-€P 



Courses of Instruction 



Introduction 



The number of each course conveys the following information: Courses 
numbered 100 to 299 are primarily for freshmen and sophomores, 300 to 499 for 
juniors and seniors. In general, odd-numbered courses are offered in the first 
semester; even-numbered courses are offered in the second semester. 



Before students enroll in any course, they are to seek advice of their faculty 
advisers. Near the close of the school year each freshman is expected to prepare 
a tentative course program for the remaining three years of college and to present 
it to his adviser for critical evaluation and counsel. At the end of the second 
year of study each student must submit for approval to the Committee on 
Academic Review his projected program. A student may revise his program at 
any time thereafter with the approval of a major adviser. 



This catalogue lists the Core courses, which all students must take, and also 
the courses according to academic divisions and academic disciplines within 
each division. Courses are conducted typically in three lecture-discussion periods 
per week supplemented by other pericjds, studios, or laboratories. 



Course descriptions are not given for the Special Topics and Senior Seminars 
because a professor is free to vary his offerings each year according to student 
interest and his own study and research. Students receiving the endorsement 
of the professors in their major field may take the ecjuivalent of two courses each 
semester during their junior and senior years in a program of guided independent 
study and research which should culminate in an acceptable thesis. 



42 




^\ 



V 



y 



Core Courses 



The basic objective of the Core Program is to ilevelop in students the cdni- 
petence and wilhngness to form and articulate responsible value juiigujents. 
Materials of the courses are drawn from the areas of Humanities, Natural Sc ience 
anci Social Science; and professors from all academic divisions of the college 
participate in the program. Special concern is accorded to the relevance of the 
Judaeo-Christian tradition and of religious commitment in the formation of 
judgments. Comparative studies are made of works and institutions fiom Asian 
and Western traditions. 

The Core Program is the common academic ex]jerience ol all siudciiis 
throughout their entire residence in the college. This program, together with 
demonstrated competence in a foreign language, in reading, in mathematics or 
logic and in recreational skills, is a general college recjuirement. 

The Core Science Course is an integrated course covering certain basic 
theories of physics, chemistry and biology, normally taken in the Sophomore 
and Junior years. It is concerned with the natiue of science and its influence 
on western society as well as with the facts of science. 



101, 102 Six hours are set aside each week for critical examination of woiks and 

institutions selected from various fields of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 
Ordinarily two or three hours are used for lectures or other presentations to the 
entire class. For two additional sessions of an hour and a half each the students 
meet in small discussion groups for detailed examination ol ilic dot uiiients under 
consideration. Discussion leaders super\ise the writing progiani ol the students 
assigned to them. 

201, 202 Six hours are reserved each week for continuation of the work in Humanities 

Core Science and Social Science which was begim in the Freshman year. Three additional 
200 hours are used in presentations, laboratories and discussions of natural science 

materials. This year's program emphasizes the Newtonian synthesis, the structure 

of the atom and the nature of chemical change. 

301, 302 In the areas of the Humanities and Social Science special attention is locused 

Core Science on the works and institutions of Asia. In Core Science the emphasis is on the 
300 cell, biological ecosystems, physical and biological evolution and modern systems 

of scientific thought. 



43 



401, 402 CHRISTIAN FAITH AND GREAT ISSUES 

For this program 12 to 14 persons of national and international prominence 
are brought to the campus to lecture to the Seniors and to discuss with them 
issues of personal and social ethics. The selection of topics and of speakers is 
made by a joint committee of faculty and students. Faculty lectures, group 
discussions and selected readings prepare the students for their encounters with 
visitina: lecturers. 



Reading 



111 READING WORKSHOP 

For any students needing or desiring to improve their reading abilities. 

112 READING WORKSHOP 

Designed to teach how and when to skim and to give practice in this skill. 
Only students who have passed the reading-proficiency test are eligible for 
this course. 

412 READING METHOD 

Instruction and practice in ways of improving reading ability, particularly 
of high school students. Identical with Edtication 412. 

DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Requirements for a Major in the Htnnanities: a reasoned program of eight 
or more courses in several of the disciplines, six of them in one area and six 
of them in courses numbered above 300. 



Art 

Requirements for a Studio Art Major: (1) Evidence of an aptitude in art 
demonstrated through submission of a portfolio in drawing and design; (2) a 
senior exhibition giving evidence of the student's achievement and search for 
artistic maturity; (3) a proficiency in at least three media and a working under- 
standing of art history (Art 201, 202, 211, 212 or demonstrate understanding of 
these same materials) in order to qualify for the senior exhibition: (4) eight 
semester courses. 

Interdisciplinary major with emphasis in Art: Art 201, 202, 211, 212, and 
two additional courses. 

201, 202 INTRODUCTION TO THE VISUAL ARTS 

Studio-discussion. An introduction to visual problems and visual problem- 
solving calling for experience in making aesthetic judgments based on personal 
involvement and objective analysis. 



44 



211, 212 HISTORY OF ^VESTERX ART 

Survey and analysis of the history of Western art and the role of art in 
Western civilization. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

221, 222 DR.\WING STUDIO 

Instruction in drawing; media. 

301, 302 INTERMEDIATE STUDIO CRITIQUE 

Independent studio work with personal insiiiKiion a\ailal)le as needed. 
Participation in regularly schedided criticjucs rei|uircd. 

Prerequisites: Art 201-202, 221-222, or ]Jcnuission. 

311, 312 ADVANCED STUDIO CRITIQUE 

Independent studio work with personal insiriuiion a\ailal)ic as ntedcd. 
Participation in regidarly scheduled critiques required. 

Prerequisites: Art 201-202, 221-222, 301-302, or permission. 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS 

Independent Study Research (Offered in 1966-67 and ahciiiaie years.) 

402 AREA STUDIES IN THE HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF ART 

Prerequisite: permission. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: Art Major or consent of instructor. 



Classics 



Requirements for a Major: Five courses in Latin beyond 202 antl lour c muses 
in Greek. History 221 and 222, Philosophy 301 and Winter Term studies in 
mythology and archaeology are strongly recommended. Students plaiuung to do 
graduate work in Classics should acquire a reailing knowledge oi Ficiich or 
German as imderjjraduates. 



Greek 

111], ](i2 ELEMENTARY GREEK 

First semester: Koine Greek with reading from the Gosj^el of John. 
Second semester: Attic Greek with reading from the Anabasis oi Xciioplion. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE GREEK 

Readings from Luke, Homer's Odyssey, a play by Euripides, and Plato's 
Apology. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 



45 



301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO GREEK LITERATURE 

Readings from Homer's Iliad, Herodotus' History, plays by Sophocles, 
Euripides and Aristophanes, with some consideration of the development of 
Greek literature. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

321 GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION 

Extensive reading of Greek masterpieces from Homer to Lucian. Classics 
majors may elect to do part of the reading in the original. 

Latin 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE LATIN 

First semester: extensive readings from medieval literature. 

Second semester: Vergil's Aeneid and Eclogues. Designed for students with 
two years of high school Latin or the equivalent. 

301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO LATIN LITERATURE 

Cicero, Pliny, Seneca and the Elegiac poets, with some consideration of the 
development of Latin literature. Designed for students with three or four years 
of high school Latin. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

311 LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION 

(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

322 LATIN LITERATURE IN TR.\NSLATION 

Extensive reading of Latin masterpieces from Plautus to Apuleius. Classics 
majors may elect to do part of the reading in the original. (Offered in 1967-68 
and in alternate years.) 

401, 402 READINGS 

Readings in Plautus, Terence, Livy and Tacitus. (Offered in 1967-68 and 
in alternate years.) 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH. 

Literature 

Requirements for a Major in general literature: a reasoned program of eight 
or more courses in literature, some of them in languages other than English, 
numbered above 300. 

Requirements for a Major in Literature with a concentration on that written 
in English: Literature 301, 302, 321, 322, 341 or 342, 431 or 432, and two other 
courses. 

Requirements for a Major with teaching certificate: Literature 301, 302, 311, 
321, 322, 401, Speech 201 or 202, and one other course. 

201, 202 MASTERPIECES OF LITERATURE 

A study of selected works of poetry, fiction and drama from many cultures. 



46 



301 AMERICAN LITERATURE 

A study of major writers through the nineteenth century. (Ottered in 1^)67-68 
and alternate years.) 

302 TWENTIETH-CENTURY ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LilERAI IRE 

A study of novels and novehsts, poems and poets, dramas and dramatisis of 
the British Isles and America: D. H. Lawrence, Hemingway, Shaw, Elioi and 
others. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

311 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 

The writing of fiction, drama, verse, persuasion, exposition. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

312 LITEILARY CRITICISM 

The literature, vocabulary, and practice of nterary analysis and evaluation. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

321, 322 ENGLISH LITERATURE 

A study of English literary history and its major writers. 

First semester: Beowulf to Milton. 

Second semester: Dryden to Arnold. (Offered in 1966-t)7 and ahernate years.) 
331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Sample topics: fiction, romanticism, lyric poetry, neo-classicism. 

341 SHAKESPEARE 

The art of Shakespeare. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

342 MILTON 

Milton's lyrics, major poems, and selected prose. (Offered in 19()()-()7 and 
alternate years.) 

401 LINGUISTICS 

The structure of language, with some attention to the history of English and 
its current characteristics. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

402 MODERN DRAMA 

The great dramatists and their theatre: Ibsen, Strindberg, C:liekhov, Synge, 
and others. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

431. 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Sample topics: Spenser, Dante, Restoration drama, Keats and J cnnysoii, 
Thoreau. 



47 



Modern Foreii>n Languages 

CHINESE, FRENCH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, SPANISH 

A general knowledge of literature and demonstrated proficiency in compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing are the measures of accomplishment in 
this area. All students, except those majoring in a foreign language, are required 
to take a third-year comprehensive examination. The senior comprehensive 
examination for majors reviews the formal program of study and is supplemented 
by an extensive reading list. 

Requirements for a major in a given language are 8 courses beyond 101-102 
or the equivalent. Study abroad will be given equivalent credit and will count 
toward the fulfillment of major requirements. Additional supporting work in 
related areas is advisable. After the first year, courses are taught ordinarily in 
the language. 

Chinese Language 

101, 102 INTRODUCTORY CHINESE 

Designed to enable the student to acqtiire elementary proficiency in spoken 
Chinese by intensive training in the oral skills. Practical vocabulary, pattern 
sentence structure and conversational drills. Writing and philology begin second 
semester by gradual introduction of basic Chinese characters. Independent 
laboratory practice in addition to scheduled laboratory classes. 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE 

Designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the written language with 
continued training in its oral use. Grammar and syntax are gradually introduced 
combining with reading, memorization and dictation exercises. Independent 
laboratory practice in addition to scheduled laboratory classes. 

301, 302 ADVANCED CHINESE 

Designed to give a working proficiency in the oral and written use of the 
language. Vernacular, literary and newspaper Chinese are introduced through 
selective readings, conversation exercises, composition and translation in the 
language. 

French Language and Literature 

101, 102 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

Intensive drill in understanding, speaking, reading and writing. A thorough 
study of grammar. Independent laboratory practice in addition to scheduled 
laboratory classes. 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

Grammar review, conversation, selected prose readings and collateral reading 
and reports. Independent laboratory practice in addition to scheduled laboratory 
classes. 



48 



301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE 

Reading ot outstanding selected prose, poetry and drama. Oral and written 
reports. 

311 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 

(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 



401 



SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE TO 1600 

A study of representative medieval and Renaissance works inciudin}; medieval 
drama and poeti7, Pleiade poets, Rabelais and Montaigne. (Ofleretl in 1 9(i(") ti? 
and alternate years.) 

402 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE 

A study of selected works of principal writers including Condilhu, Uullon, 
Voltaire, Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau. (Offered in 1967-68 and altcrnaic 
years.) 

^04 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE 

A study of the principal works of Corneille, Racine and Molicrc. (Ollercd 
in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

411, 412 NINETEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE 

A study of selected works in the field of the novel, drama and poetry of the 
more important writers of the period, including C^hateauijriand, Lamartine. 
Hugo, Vigny, Musset, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola, Maujjassant, Baudelaire, 
Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarme. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

421, 422 TWENTIETH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE 

A study of selected novels, dramas and poems by some of ihe more impoiian 
writers including Gide, Proust, Romains, Mauriac, Giraudoux, Saiiii I- xiipcry 
Camus, Valery, Claudel, Sartre, Saint-John Perse, lonesco, Beckett. 
(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

431 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 



German Laii*ruage and Lilc^ratiire 



lOI, 102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

Intensive drill in understanding, sjjeaking, reading aiui wiiiini^. I.iiciaiuic 
introduced second semester. Independent laijoratory piacticc in addiiioii to 
scheduled laboratory classes. Course is also designed lor superior and slow 
students in taped, programmed frjrm. 



49 



201, 202 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

Grammar review, conversation and modern German short stories. Inde- 
pendent laboratory practice required in addition to one scheduled laboratory 
class. 

301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 

Reading ot German masterpieces, poetry and prose, from the twelfth century 
to the present. Includes all genres. Weekly lectures on the history of German 
literature in German. Critical and analytical book reports in German. 

311 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 

Student participation in teaching theoretical and practical aspects of grammar. 
Topical discussions and written assignments in the language. 

401, 402 THE NOVEL 

A study of the most representative novelists from Goethe in the eighteenth 
century to the present. Includes Thomas Mann, Hermann Hesse, and the young 
w-riters of present-day Germany, Austria and Switzerland. (Offered in 1966-67 
and alternate years.) 

403, 404 DRAMA 

German drama from Goethe to the present. Particular emphasis on drama 
of the nineteenth century and the present. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate 

years.) 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Independent course work according to student needs. Included are such 
topics as Goethe's Faust, German poetry, the German novelle, history of the 
German language, independent readings, thesis research and writing. 

Russian Language and Literature 

101, 102 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN 

Elementary introduction with stress on oral and aural. Independent labora- 
tory practice in addition to scheduled laboratory classes. Reading based on 
abridged selections from the novels of Pushkin and Lermontov. 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN 

Emphasis on daily dictation, conversation, and composition. Independent 
laboratory practice in addition to scheduled laboratory classes. Reading of 
selected portions from the novels of Pushkin, Lermontov, and Turgenev. 

301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN LITERATURE 

Readings in prose, poetry and drama from the Golden Age through the 
Soviet period. Works of Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevski, Tolstoi, Ler- 
montov, Bunin, Sholokhov, and Pasternak. 



50 



401, 402 READINGS 

A survey of Russian literature, including some Soviet literature; monthly 
compositions in Russian. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY. RESEARCH 

Research in areas such as the history ot radical thought in Russia, the positive 
and negative hero in the Russian novel, the development of Russi;in drama. 



Spanish Lanijjiiage and Lileratnre 

101, 102 ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

Intensive drill in understanding, speaking, reading and -writing. .V thorough 
study of grammar patterns. Independent laboratory practice in acMiiion to 
scheduled laboratory classes. 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

Continuation of 101, 102, with a review of granniKU. Emj)hasis on iiading 
in the second semester. Indejjendent laboratory practice required in addition 
to one scheduled laboratory class. 

301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 

Exegesis, analysis, and evaluation of literary texts with attention to language 
and literary history. 

311 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 

An intensive analysis of the structure of the language with extensive con- 
versational drill in the use of idioms. Designed particidarly for future teachers. 

401, 402 THE NOVEL 

First semester: a study of the most representative novelists from the Generac i('m 
del '98 to the present. Second semester: a study of the Spanish-American novel 
from its beginnings to the present. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

403, 404 DR.\MA 

First semester: a study of the works of the best modern jjjavui ighis iioiii 
Benavente to the present. Second semester: a study of the most reprcseniaiive 
plays of Spain's Golden Age. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

A thorough study of the outstanding aspet ts, authois, works, genres, or periods 

of Hispanic literature and culture, according to siudcnts' needs: Cervantes, 

Unamuno, Lope de Vega, Garcia Lorca, Juan Ramon Jimenez, Ruben Dario, 

El Cil, La Celeslina, Modernism, Romanticism, the Generation del '98, 

Civilizacion Espanola, and Civilizacion Hispanoamericana. 



51 



Music 

Requirements for a Major: Music 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302 and two addi- 
tional courses; applied music and participation in an ensemble. Music 321 and 
322 are required for a teaching certificate. 

101, 102 THEORY OF TONAL HARMONY 

Analysis and composition in small homophonic forms. Instruction in harmony, 
notation, dictation, sight reading, ear training and keyboard harmony. 

201, 202 ADVANCED THEORY OF TONAL HARMONY 

Analysis and composition in more complex homophonic forms. 

211, 212 INTRODUCTION TO MUSICAL LITERATURE AND STYLES 

Study of the literature and styles of Western music from the Middle Ages to 
the present. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

301 THEORY OF MODAL COUNTERPOINT 

Analysis and composition in the style of Palestrina. (Offered 1966-67 and 
alternate years.) Prerequisite: Music 202. 

302 THEORY OF TONAL COUNTERPOINT 

Analysis and composition in the style of Bach. (Offered 1967-68 and alternate 
years.) Prerequisite: Music 202. May be taken prior to Music 301 with permission 
of the instructor. 

321, 322 PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Analysis of problems of teaching and administration of music in the elementary 
and secondary schools with emphasis upon special methods; evaluation of music 
literature. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

401, 402 SELECTED TOPICS 

Depending upon the needs of various classes, the two courses will have subjects 
such as form, analysis, and composition; music literature; orchestration and con- 
ducting, ethnomusicology; church music. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

Prerequisites: Music 301, 302, or permission of the instructor. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Studies in history of musical styles. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 
Prerequisite or corequisite: Music 301, 302. 

Applied Music 

Individual instruction is offered in voice, organ, piano, and wind, brass, and 
string instruments. Music majors who are freshmen and sophomores receive 
credit of one hour for a semester of individually instructed applied music, upper- 
classmen two hours. A music major must earn twelve hours. 



52 



Freshmen and sophomores who are music majors earn an hour for a year 
of ensemble participation, upperchissmen two. A nuisic major nnist participate 
in an ensemble during each semester of residence and earn for graduation a 
minimum of six hours. 

Students at Florida Presbyterian College may earn ensemble credit l)y rehears- 
ing and playing with the St. Petersburg Symjihony Orchestra or the Pinellas 
County Youth Symphony. 



Tliealre and Speecli 



No major is offered in Theatre and Speech, but students may clc( t an inter- 
disciplinary major with concentration in Theatre ami Speech. Such a concen- 
tration would include six semester courses chosen from Literature 341, Literature 
402 and from the following courses: 

201, 202 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH 

First semester: Emphasis upon discussion and public address. 

Second semester: Emphasis upon the oral interpretation of literature. 

301 THEATRE ARTS: THE MASS MEDIA 

A study of the theatre arts as expressed in the mass media. Drama and other 
performing arts will be studied with regard to the conditions of radio, television, 
and especially the motion picture. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

302 THEATRE PRODUCTION: DESIGN AND TECHNIQUE 

A consideration of the scenic image: the study ofthe script with relationship 
to the design and construction of scenery, costumes, lighting, and to the archi 
lecture of the theatre. Laboratory sessions and participation in theatre work- 
shop. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

311 THEATRE ARTS: THE LIVING THEATRE 

The theatre studied as a contemporary art: selected works of dramatic 
literature studied with relationship to theatre history and to the conditions of 
production before an audience and the community. (Offered in 1966-67 and 
alternate years.) 

312 THEATRE PRODUCTION: DIRECTING THE PLAY 

The analysis of the play script for performance; the development of design; 
the direction of acting and staging with special reference to ediuational, com- 
munity, and church theatres. Laboratory sessions and participation in theatre 
work shop. Prerequisite: consent of professor. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate 
years.) 

431 THEATRE PROJECTS 

Participation in theatrical producticjn as actors, directors, designers, 
technicians. 

432 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 

Research or participation in independent creative j^rojects including jday- 
writing. 



53 



Philosophy 



Requirements for a Major: Philosophy 211, 301, 302, 311, 312, 331 or 332, 
431 or 432, and one additional course. 

Requirements for a Philosophy and Religion Major, with emphasis in 
Philosophy: Philosophy 211, 301, 302, 311, 312, 431 or 432, and two courses in 
Religion. 

101, 102 LOGIC 

A study of the logical dimensions of language and the elements of logical 
systems with particular emphasis on symbolic logic and scientific method. 

211 ETHICS 

Main types of ethical theory and their implications for contemporary problems 
of personal and social morality. 

301 HISTORY OF GREEK AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY 

A study from primary sources of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through 
Plotinus with basic attention to the nature of metaphysical problems. 
(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

302 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE PHILOSOPHY 

A study from primary sources of philosophy from Augustine to Descartes 
with basic attention to the relationship between faith and reason. 
(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

311 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY 

A study from primary sources of philosophy from Descartes through Kant 
with basic attention to problems of knowledge. (Offered in 1967-68 and 
alternate years.) 

312 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL MOVEMENTS 

A study from primary sources of the major philosophical movements of the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries such as voluntarism, existentialism, idealism, 
the analytic movement, pragmatism, with emphasis on their treatments of crucial 
modern problems. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

A study of the relationship between philosophy and other academic disciplines 
with an emphasis on presuppositional analysis. The student will read independ- 
ently in his field of interest such as philosophy of science, aesthetics, social 
philosophy, philosophy of religion, philosophy of history. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Advanced seminar for majors, and preparation for thesis. 



54 




Requirements for a Major: Religion 201. 1*02. :U)I, :W2. j'.W. TVl. LSI, l:]'!. 

Recjuirenients lor a Major in Pliilosopln and Religion with tiiiphasis in 
Religion: Religion 201, 202, 'Ml, 302; Plnl()s()|)liN :U)\, ':;02, and two stiinnars, 
one in Religion and one in Philosophy. 

201 INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD IKSIAMKN I 

An inductive inquiry into the literature, histors and tiicologs i>l ihe llchiew 
Scriptures. 

202 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTANHiN I 

An inductive inquiry into the literature, history and theology ol die earliest 
Christian dociunents. 

301, 302 HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 

A detailed study ol Christian thought as it appears in the writing ol lepre- 
sentative leaders antl movements Irom the .\postolic Age to the Relorniaiion 
and horn the Relormation to the piesent. 
(Ollered in 19G()-()7 and alternate years.) 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

The interests and needs of students determine the subjects in both Sjjccial 
Topics and Senior Seminar. Possible subjects: world religions, individual books 
of the Bible, contemporary theological movements, individual theologians, 
devotional classics, problems in Christian ethics. Religion 331 and 332 are open 
to Junior majors in religion, and to other students by permission of the instructor; 
Religion 431 and 432 are open to Senior rtiajors in religion. 



t 



THE DIVISION OF HISTORY AND 
THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History 

Requirements for a Major: 8 coinses in history and successful (oinpleiion of 
written and oral comprehensive examinations in senior year. Majors expeding 
to do graduate work in history should ordinarily take History 431 the first 
semester of their senior year. 

201, 202 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Political, economif and diploniaiic aspcds ol (he .\incriran cxpcricnrc. 



55 



203 THE EARLY AND MIDDLE HISTORY OF EUROPE TO 1648 

A survey of the Europe that appeared alter the fall of the Roman Empire 
in the west. Major emphases will be on Christian foundations, the feudal search 
for a polity, the Byzantine world, the age of discovery and the Reformation. 
Extensive readings from documents, textbooks, lectures and discussions. 

204 HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE, 1648-1945 

A survey of the development of modern Europe from the age of Louis XIV 
to the end of World War II. Extensive readings from documents will be co- 
ordinated with basic textbooks, lectures and discussions. 

231 THE MEETING OF INDIAN AND IBERIAN, 1200-1800 

Introduction to Mexican, Mayan, Incan and Medieval Spanish history. 
These studies to be joined at the point where the story of the Spanish discovery 
and conquest begin. The Colonial period in Latin America will be studied 
topically. Knowledge of Spanish recommended. (Offered in 1967-68 and alter- 
nate years.) 

232 LATIN AMERICA, 1800 TO THE PRESENT 

Histories and cultures of Middle and South American nations from the pre- 
cursors of independence to the present. Reading of some Latin American novels 
and the drawing of maps. Each student will be assigned a special country or an 
aspect of it as a full term project. Knowledge of Spanish recommended. (Offered 
in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

301, 302 HISTORY OF ENGLAND AND MODERN BRITAIN 

The first semester treats the history of the English people to 1688. The sec- 
ond semester traces the development of a modern industrial society and its im- 
perial expansion. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

303, 304 ANCIENT HISTORY 

The ancient world from prehistoric times to the decline of the Roman Empire. 
(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

31 1, 312 AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 

Development of American thought, culture and social institutions. 

321 THE RISE OF RUSSIA 

The rise of Russian society and culture from the origins of the first Russian 
state to 1 80 1. Major topics to be considered will be Kievan Rus, the Rise of 
Muscovy, and Peter the Great. 

322 MODERN RUSSIA AND THE SOVIET UNION 

The history of Russia from 1801 to the present, with special emphasis on 
the revolutions of 1917 and Soviet Russia. 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 



56 



401 EUROPE FROM THE FRENCH REVOLUTION TO WORLD \VAR 1 

The French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, political antl social move- 
ments of the nineteenth century and the background ot World War I. (Oncreil 
in 1966-67 and alternate years). 

■102 TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPE 

The failure of the Versailles settlement; the collapse of the Eurc)pean 
economy; the rise of totalitarianism and the crisis of democracy; international 
relations and World War II; the Cold War and recent problems of Europe. 
(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 



Econoniics and Business 

Requirements for Major: (a) 8 courses including Economics L'Ol, 2()li, l.'il, 
432; (b) Mathematics 102. 

Majors are encouraged to enroll for a junior seminar (3.'51, 332) in addition 
to the required senior seminar. 

201, 202 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

The modern income approach and the neo-classical price aj)i)roacli. 

203 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

Designed to acquaint the student with the history and structure of modern 
American economics and to provide a general knowledge of the various activi- 
ties of a business, such as production and marketing. (Offered in 1966-67 and 
alternate years.) 

211, 212 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 

Intended to provide a general knowledge of accounting practices. The thcorv 
and construction of financial statements. Laboratory training. (Olicrcd in 
1966-67 and alternate years.) 

301 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 

Development of economic analysis from early classicism to the modern period. 
The orthodox movements; classicism, the Marshallian and the post-Marshal liaii 
systems, the Austrian school. The opposition: the historical school, insiiiuiion- 
alism, Marx, Keynes and their followers. 

302 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY 

The regulation of foreign trade. Theoretical analysis, comparative advantages, 
balance of payments. Foreign trade of the United States, the underdeveloped 
countries. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 



57 



311 LABOR ECONOMICS 



The development, structure, goals and policies of labor organizations; major 
issues in labor-management relations; and public policy toward labor unions. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

312 MONEY AND BANKING 

Functions of money, the currency systems, the exchange equation, and the 
circulation of money; the Federal Reserve System. 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 PUBLIC FINANCE 

Shifting and incidence of taxation. The countervailing fiscal policy. Federal, 
state and municipal taxation. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

403 INTERMEDIATE THEORY 

The theory of games. Linear approach. 

411 BUSINESS CYCLES 

Statistical observations; theories of growth; modern explanation of cycles. 
Survey of cycles after 1929. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

421 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 

Theory of capitalistic society, Marxism, Leninism and the modern Russian 
economy. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Education 

Students considering a teaching career in secondary schools should seek 
counsel on their course program early in their college training. In this way 
their course schedules can be planned to meet certification requirements. Such 
students should plan to take the following courses: 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 
421 and 422. 

201 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 

The development of the public school system, contemporary issues and his- 
torical philosophies of education; the role of the school in a democratic society. 

202 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The application of psychological principles to the work of the school. Learn- 
ing, motivation, forgetting, transfer ol training and personality adjustment. 

301 PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATION 

New teaching techniques adapted to instructional programs of secondary 
schools; aspects of administration for classroom teachers; organization, finance, 
personnel, supervision, scheduling and activities. 



58 



302 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN SECX:)NDARV EDUCATION 

A survey and critical analysis ot the methods and curriculuiii ot secondary- 
school teaching. Special methods, materials and techniques used in the specific 
subject for which certification is requested. Instruction in principles of tliat^uosis 
and developmental teaching. 

303 SPECIAL METHODS 

Emphasis on teaching methods in the specific sidjject field in whidi cer- 
tification is sought. 

TM, XV2 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS 

Instruction in the fundamental principles of the organization ol sui.ill 
libraries; procedures of acquisition, preparation, classification, anil (ataioj^uing. 

402 REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY 

A study of general reference books and reference materials in specific sub- 
jects appropriate to school and community use. Evaluation, selection and uses. 

412 READING METHOD 

Instruction and practice in ways of imj^roving reading ability, jxirtic ularly 
of high school students. 

421, 422 STUDENT TEACHING 

Observation and teaching activities in High Schools in the vicinity of ihe 
College. Observation is begun during the Fall of the Senior year. In February 
and March, the student is involved in leaching experience. Seniors will devote 
more than 200 hours to this internship. 



Geography 



201 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY 

An introductory survey of the world's people and resources in the selling 
of space and time. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

202 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNII EI) STATES 

A study of patterns of settlement and resource utilization in selected areas 
of the United States. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 



59 



Political Science 

Requirements for a Major: Political Science 201 or 202, 303, 311, 312, 431 
or 432 and four additional courses. 

201 PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Introduction to political science, with some attention to scope and methods 
of the discipline. Attention directed to some of the major issues of govern- 
ment and politics. 

202 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Theory and practice of modern constitutional democracy through analysis 
of constitutional foundations, patterns of politics and the structure and func- 
tioning of national government in the United States. 

301 FOREIGN AND COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 

Formal governmental structures and political processes in the major con- 
stitutional states of Western Europe: Great Britain, France and Germany. (Of- 
fered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

302 FOREIGN AND COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 

Internal government and political and interrelationships of the Soviet Union, 
Soviet bloc states and China. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

303 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

Forces and form of politics among nations. The modern state system, na- 
tionalism, internationalism, imperialism, foreign politics, war and cold war. 
Balance of power, morality, organization and law as restraints on the power 
struggle. Problems of world stability and peaceful change. 

311 WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT 

Great thinkers and important philosophic movements of the Western po- 
litical heritage, from Plato to the sixteenth century. Emphasis on reading and 
analysis of primary sources. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

312 WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT 

Main currents in political theory since the Reformation. (Offered in 1966-67 
and alternate years.) 

321 AMERICAN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

Constitutional structures, political processes, and problems of state and 
municipal governments and intergovernmental relations. (Offered in 1967-68 
and alternate years.) 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

Formulation and execution of American foreign policy. Analysis of substan- 
sive issues in recent and contemporary policies. (Offered in 1966-67 and al- 
ternate years.) 



60 



411 INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

Some major problems of United States' constitutional interpretation and 
development, with emphasis on reading and analysis of Supreme Court ojMuions. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

412 POLITICS AND POLICY FORMATION 

Forces, institutions and processes in the competition for power and policy, 
with special reference to the United States. Public opinion, pn)|jagan(la. political 
behavior, interest groups, leadership and particularly political parties and ilie 
legislative process. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 



Physical Education 



Ordinarily a two-year program of physical education is required of each 
student prior to entrance into the junior year. The objective of the course is 
to develop in the student approj^riate attitudes, skills and knowledge lor leisure 
time and recreational activities appropriate to his needs and interests. 

The program consists of a two-hour laboratory period each week su])ple- 
mented occasionally by special lectures and demonstrations. The lal)oratory 
period is devoted to individual sports such as archery, fencing, golf, gymnas- 
tics, riding, sailing, swimming, tennis, bowling and weight lifting. Eacli student 
is expected to attain a certan level of proficiency in four activities and at least 
one laboratory must be taken in each of the four following groups: Swiimning, 
Boating, Body Development and Recreational Sports. 

It should be noted that entering students may receive credit foi an activity 
by demonstrating a proficiency in and a knowledge of that sport. Proliciency 
tests will be scheduled periodically during the year. 

The above requirements may be waived or altered for individual studeiUs: 
upon recommendation of the college physician, upon reconunendation of the 
Director of Physical Education with approval of the Dean of the Ccjllege, and 
upon transfer entrance at the junior and senior level. 



Psychology 



Requirements for a Major: (a) Psychology 201, 202 and six addiiion:!! courses 
which may include Education 202; (b) Mathematics 102 loi iliosc siudciiis con 
templating graduate study in Psychology. Psychology 201 is prerecjuisiie lo all 
other courses and in addition Slaihematics 102 lor .Advanced Exjjerunc iiial 
Psychology and Psycholcjgical Measurements (exceptions with pci mission). 

201 PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOCY 

Major concejns, melhods and problems involved in tlic study ol hu- 
man behavior. 



61 



202 PRINCIPLES OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR 

Emphasis on the processes which contribute to personality. 

301 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS 

The construction, achninistration and interpretation of group and individual 
tests ot intelligence, personality, interests and achievement. Laboratory train- 
ing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. 

302 BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 

Origins, classitications, care and treatment of the common behavioral dis- 
orders. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

311 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 

Basic psychological principles in the study of the child from birth to pub- 
erty. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

312 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The influence of social variables on the behavior of the individual; social 
perception, language, attitudes, propaganda; social probleins. (Offered in 1967- 
68 and alternate years.) 

.S21 EXPERIMENTAL PSYC:H0L0GY 

Scientific methodology, critical evaluation of classical and contemporary 
research particularly in motivation, learning and perception. Some opportunity 
for individual research. 

;}31, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 PERSONALITY THEORY 

Theories of personality examined in the light of recent research. (Offered 
in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

402 BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychological procedures in employment selection, training, efficiency and 
human relations. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

411 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Integrative theories, including structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, 
hormic psychology, Gestalt psychology and psychoanalysis. (Offered in 1967-68 
and alternate years.) 

412 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Physiological correlates of behavior. Special emphasis on the nervous system. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

422 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Critical evaluation and design of research: crucial experiments and con- 
troversial issues; individual research. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 



62 



8oeiolo*iy ai.,. »i 



Rfciuircmciits tor a Major: (a) .Sc)cii)l()t^\ L'OI, LIDl^, 101 ami li\c atidiiioiial 
tourses; (b) MatluMiiatiis 102 ioi tiiose contenijjjatiiit; t^iachiaic woik m Soi i()l<)i;\ . 

201 GENERAL AN IHROPOLOGY 

An undersianclino ol the conce|)t oi "(iilimc." liow linman soiiciv (>|>(i ncs 
in context ot primitive social insiituiioiis aiul an iiuiocIik iimi lo pluscial 
anthropology and archeology. 

202 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOCV 

The stiidv and application ol inajoi sociological concepts, social |)roc esses, 
institutions, striictine and groii]) relations. 

204 MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

Analysis ot selected contemporary social problems in the I'niicd Siaies. 
Students are introduced to current sociological literatiue, research and ilie 
role of sociology in confronting such issues. 

301 SOCIOLOGY OF MARRIAGE 

The study of processes leading to the institution of marriage in AiiKiiiau 
society, the structure and significant changes in the pattern of faniilv life. Some 
comparative analyses. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

302 SOCIAL WORK 

A survey of the fields and methods ot social work. 

311 MlNORiriES 

Problems associateil with idenlilication ol minoiitv gioups - soc iai. icligious, 
ethnic. (Offered in 1966-67 and ahernate yeais.) 

312 CRIMINOLOGY 

The nature, causes, prevention of crime and the treatmcni ol i i Iminals. 
(Offered in 1966-67 and alternate years.) 

321 THE CO.MMl .\ri\ 

Contemporary rural and urban life. .\n introduction to hiniian ciolo^v and 
demography. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

322 CLLTl'RE AND PKRSONALHA 

The study cjf the field of psychological aiuhropology, its iiaiuic and iis 
methods, and of comparative comj^Iex societies and the naiional chaiacici. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) 

323 RESEARCH DESIGN AND APPLICATION 

Systematic consideration of behavioral sciences research design (f)nccpis and 
techniques, with selected application each year in different research siin.iiions. 
(Offered 1967-68 and alternate years.) 



63 



3:51, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 SOCIAL THEORY 

Systematic analysis ot major contributions to the tield ot sociological thought 
since Comte. 

411, 412 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SOCIAL WORK 

Field experience and observation under the supervision of professionally 
qualified social workers in selected local agencies. I\Iust be taken for full year 
and counts as one course. Prerequisite: Sociology 302. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

THE DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS 
AND THE NATURAL SCIENCES 
Mat heiiia ties 

Requirements for a major: Eight courses beyond Mathematics 202. 
90 TRIGONOMETRY 

This is an independent study, non-credit course designed to prepare the 
student who did not study trigonometry in high school for the calculus 
sequence 199, 200. 

101 FINITE MATHEMATICS 

Logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, probability theory, vectors 
and matrices, linear programming and the theory of games. 

102 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 

Discrete and continuous distribution functions, sampling, distributions, 
statistical inference, regression and correlation. 

199, 200 ONE VARIABLE CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

Plane analytic geometry integrated with calculus of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions of a single variable; formal integration and applications, 
infinite series. Prerequisite: 7"rigonometry in high school or Mathematics 90. 

201, 202 LINEAR ALGEBRA AND CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES 

Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, vector 
calculus, the differential, inverse functions, iterated and multiple integrals. 
Prerecpiisite: Mathematics 200. 



64 



301, 302 DlFFKRl-NTl AL EOrATIONS AM) AinWCF O rAKlirs 

'I'opics lor ;ul\anc:ctl cakulus wliicli l)tai pai lii uhirU ujjoii ilillcuiiiial cijua- 
tions. Major emphasis is upon l)otii linear ami non-linear ilitlerential etjuaiions, 
inchulino series solutions, numerical mcth(nls. existence iheoiems, siaiulitv 
considerations, and an iniKiduc lion to paiiial dil It reiui.d eijuaiKins. Pifre- 
quisite: Mathematics L'Oli. 

311, 312 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 

Topics trom groups, rings lields, \ec tor spaces, matrices. (^Olleied in I'.Hid (iT 
and alternate years.) Prerecpiisiie; Consent ol prolessor. 

321, 322 REAL ANAL^■,S1S 

A study of the real number system, elements of point set theory, limits and 
continuity, partial differentiation, Riemann-Stieltjes integration, multiple in- 
tegrals and line integrals, vector analysis, sequences of functions, Fourier series. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) Prerequisite: Mathematics 202, or 
consent of professor. 

331, 332 SPECLAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Typical topics: Modern geometry, prohaljiliiv and siaiixtics. hisum and 
foundations of mathematics. Prerccpiisite: Consent ol prolessoi. 

411, 412 TOPOLOGY 

Elementary point set topology including metric spaces, compactness, con- 
nectivity and the separation axioms. Introduction to algebraic and combina- 
tional topology including the fundamental group, covering spaces, complexes. 
(Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) Prerequisites: Mathcmaiics 202 or 
consent of professor. 

421, 422 COMPLEX ANALYSIS 

Fundamental properties of complex ninnbers; analytic fiuidions, diilerentia- 
tion and integration theorems, conlormal mapping. Tavlor and Laurent series, 
applications to boundary value prol)lems. (Oiiered in 19()(>(i7 and .ihcni.iic 
years.) Prerequisite: Consent of professor. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STl'DY, RESF.\RC11 



64 



Biology 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Biology 103. 10 1 and cigiu acldiiion.il (ouises 
in Biology, depending upon the interest ol the student; {]>} Chcnnsiry 221, 
and Physics 201, 202. 



'>'}'> 



103, 104 GENERAL BIOLOGY 



Provides an understanding of and appreciation of biological mechanisms 
and principles through critical analysis of life processes and synthesis of basic 
facts and concepts. The nature of living matter, the cell and protoplasm, 
metabolism, reproduction, development, inheritance, the organism and its en- 
vironment and evolution. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. 



65 



201 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE BIOLOGY 

A study of the structure and evolutionary development of the organs and 
systems of representatives of the phylum Chordata. Morphology in relation to 
classification, mode of life and adaptation to the environment. Lecture 2 hours; 
laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 103, 104. 

202 VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 

The study of the development of the vertebrate body from single-celled egg 
to hatching or birth. The formation of organ-systems and the experimental 
approach to animal development. Lecture-discussion 2 hours; laboratory 6 hours. 
Prerequisite: Biology 201. 

301 ORGANIC EVOLUTION 

Current theories of the origin of life, the phylogenetic relationships of liv- 
ing organisms. Darwinian and neo-Darwinian concepts of evolutionary me- 
chanisms. Genetics and isolation, the relationship of human culture, and the 
impact of Darwinism. Discussion 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

311 GENETICS 

Fundamental principles and mechanisms of inheritance. Lecture-discussion 
3 hours; laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 103, 104, and Mathematics 
101 or consent of professor. 

312 ECOLOGY 

Physical, chemical, and biological interrelationships in a natural community. 
Environment factors, populations, the community concept, traffic in energy 
and biogeochemical cycles, and social organizations of animal groups. Field work 
essentially aquatic, in nearby freshwater lakes and gulf bays. Lecture-discussion 
3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. (Offered in 1967-68 and alternate years.) Prerequisite: 
Biology 103, 104. 

321 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

A study of the structure, function, and interrelations of invertebrate animals. 
Laboratory includes field collections and detailed study of living and preserved 
specimens. Lecture-discussion 2 hours; laboratory 6 hours. (Offered in 1967-68 
and alternate years.) Prerequisite: Biology 103, 104. 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 BIOLOGY OF CELLS AND TISSUES 

A survey of the structure, ultrastructure, and function of cells and tissues. 
Laboratory includes critical study of prepared slides, electromicrographs, and 
cell physiology technique. Lecture-discussion 2 hours; Ial)oratory 6 hours. (Of- 
fered 1966-67 and alternate years.) Prerequisite: Biology 103, 104; Chem. HI, 112. 

402 GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY 

An integrated study of the basic principles of physiology with emphasis on 
the evolution of animal processes in relation to the environment. Lecture- 
discussion 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. (Offered 1966-67 and alternate years.) 
Prerequisite: Biology 103, 104; Chem. Ill, 112. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

66 



Ch 



em 



Rf(|uiiriiifnis loi ;i Major: (,i) ClieinisiiN Ml. 11_', 'J'J 1 , L'L'L', ;> I I , :\\'2. .Sf)!', 
•111. '-1. l-'l. l-"'-- (1)) MailK'in.iiics 1')!). L'OO. 1^(11, 'JUL'. ,i ) IMusus 1^(11.' 2()'_'.' 
(.eiin.iii or Russian is i fc oniinnulctl lor ilic lanmia,i;c hhjuii ciiuiii. Mailniiiaius 
.'i<M, ;10L: or PInsics .'-iOl, .'iOli aic icc onniinukil as clt'iiiNcs. 

MI. ML' IN IROnrcrORN COl.LM.K CM KM IS 1 R\ 

IiUrodiu tion to mocin ii coiucpls aiul pi iiu iplcs ol ( luinisii \ iiK Iiulin- aioniic 
aiul niolec ulai stnu iiiif, hoiulinn, periodic iclalionships, siou hionuii \ . (luinual 
ecjuililnia, tlu'inical kiiiciics, ihcinuxK naiiiic s and llici inoi luinisii \ and dis( ns 
sioiis in teinisol ilicsc ( oiu cpts and principles. l,al)oiaioi\ woi k is lai-il\ (inan- 
tilati\e in naluie. Lecture ,'1 Iiouis; lahoiaioiA .'1 liouis. ( lo i c(|uisuc: Mailie- 
nialics Iil9. 

L'21, 222 ORC.AXiC CHKMISTRV 

Aliphatic and aioiiiati-c carbon c()m]M)unds. I-inphasis on siruciina! theory 
and reaction niec hanisnis as they iiilluence s\ntluti( iiicihods. 1 ..iIjoi aiorv 
l\^chnic|nes are illnstraied with siandard-tapei e(|ui|)iiuiu. l,c(inic ,; houis. 
lal)oiator\ I hours. Preiec|uisiie: Clieiiiisii\ 112. 

:hi chkmic.vl koimlirri.v 

KleiiientaiN tiiennodvnainics, IioinoL;eiious and heterogenous inolecul.ii e(|ui- 
libria, ionic ecpiilihria, electroc iieniisliy, separations. auaK^cs, lundanuiiial in- 
.strimiental tec hnic|ues and cheniieal kinetics. Lccline I houis; lalnnatoiN S iiouis. 
Pieiecinisite: (IheniisiiN 112; Plusics 202; Matheniaiiis 2(H). 

'.12 MOLECULAR STRl'CTL'RK 

Kinetic molecular theory, elciiieniai\ (pianiiun luechaiuts. aiomii ,uid 
molecular structure, condensed slates ol niatier, elei 1 1 oiiiaL;uci k chspci sk mi .md 
radioc heinistrv . Lectiiie l'> hours; Ial)oiaioi\ .1 hours. Prere(|uisiii : ( lieiuisin 111. 

352 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 

Laboratory applications and theory ol polaiinieiiA, polaronraphv, s|)e(tro 
photometry, gas chromotography, radiation sc aiterini:;, ladiotracer iiieihods and 
electrogravimetry. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory (i houis. I'leiecjuisue: (Jicm 
istry 341. 

411 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Lectures or seminars stressing the properties and reactions of elemenis and 
compounds in terms of modern concepts of bonding, structure and mechanism. 
Laboratory work in inorganic synthesis. Lecture 3 hours; optional labc)ratory 
3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 341. 



67 



421 QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 

The separation, purification and characterization of organic compounds. 
Illustration of the use of functional-group analysis and spectrophotometric 
methods in the proof of structure for organic compounds. Lecture 2 hours; 
laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222, 342. 

422 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Lectures and seminars concerning structural theory and electron distribu- 
tion on reaction mechanisms and molecular rearrangements. Laboratory work 
illustrating organic synthesis and research techniques. Lecture 2 hours; optional 
laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222, 342. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

442 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Lectures and seminars in areas of special interest including quantum 
mechanics, nuclear chemistry, surface phenomenon, proteins and high poly- 
mers. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. 



Physics 



Requirements for a Major: (a) Physics 201, 202, 301, 302, 321, 322, 401, 
402, 421, 422, 431, 432, (b) Mathematics 302. 



201, 202 GENERAL PHYSICS 



The basic concepts and theories of physics on an introductory level. Includes 
the classical theories of mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, 
along with the concepts of modern physics. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 200. 

301, 302 MODERN PHYSICS 

Development of the concepts and theories of contemporary physics emphasiz- 
ing electronics, atomic and nuclear physics based on the quantum theory and 
relativity. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202 and Mathematics 201, 
202. Co-requisite: Mathematics 301, 302. 

313 ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION 

A general treatment of classical waves including refraction, interference, 
diffraction, and polarization. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. (Offered in 
1967-68 and alternate years.) Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202. 



68 




314 THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS 

A generalization of the concepts of heat, work, energy, temperature and 
entropy as applied to many particle systems. Lecture 3 \ ours. (Offered in ]%7-()8 
and alternate years.) Prerequisite: Physics 301. 

321. 322 INTERMEDIATE LABORATORY 

A series of intermediate le\xi expcrinicnis in moikiii plusics, rkniiu.il 
measurements and laboratory techniques. Laboratory 3 houis Im :1L'|, u lioms 
for 322. Both 321 and 322 must i)e taken for one course (icdii. 

331, 332 SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

311 ELECTRONICS 

Theory and application of electronics circuits and insirumciits. Lc<tuie 
3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (Offered in 1966-67 and alicrnaic \cars.) Pic- 
requisite: Physics 201, 202. 

312 MOLECULAR AND SOLID STATE PHYSICS 

A study of the properties and structures of molecules, gases and solids Ixiscd 
on the quantum theory. Lecture 3 hours. (Offered in 1966-67 and alternate 
years.) Prerequisite: Physics 301 and 311. 

401 CLASSICAL THEORETICAL MECHANICS 

The dynamics of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies using vector 
methods. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202, MathematKs :i(ll. 302. 

402 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 

Principles of static and dynamic electric and magnetic fields using vector 
methods. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 401. 

421, 422 ADVANCED LABORATORY 

A series of more advanced experiments and research tcchnicpies in inodnn 
physics including design and construction of equipment .and ])arii( ip:ui()n in 
research projects. Laboratory 3 hours for 421, 6 hours lor 122. Hoil) 121 .ind 
422 must be taken for one course credit. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH. 



East Asia Areas Sliulies 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Chinese Language 101-102, 201-202, 301-302; 
(b) East Asia Studies 201-202, 431-432, and four additional courses. Ordinarily 
the four selected courses should provide an emphasis in either the Social Sciences 
or the Humanities. (To be offered beginning in 1967-68.) 



201 CHINA BEFORE 1842 



A basic introductory course of Chinese history from the earliest times lill the 
formal opening of China to the West. Special attention is given to the develop- 
ment of political, social, religious, and intellectual institutions and traditions. 



69 



202 



CHINA FROM 1842 TO THE PRESENT 



A continuation of History 201 with more emphasis on the transformation 
and modernization of China in recent times. 

302 COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS: U.S.S.R. AND CHINA 

303 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE EAST 

304 SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF CHINA 

321 PHILOSOPHY OF ASIA 

322 RELIGIONS OF ASIA 

331 ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPING NATIONS 

341, 342 LITERATURE OF THE EAST 

351, 352 HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF EASTERN ART 

401 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 




70 



Calendar of Even Is 
1967-1968 

September 1 Orientation period; incoming freshmen should airive on campus 

before noon 

September 2 Dormitories open to upperclassmen at noon 

September 4 Independent study examinations and reexaminations 

September 5 Fall Semester commences at 8 a.m. 

September 5 Convocation 

October 16-19 Mid-Semester examination period 

October 20-21 Visitation of parents; no classes 

November 2 Meeting of Board of Trustees 

November 23 Thanksgiving Day; no classes 

December 8 Fall Semester examination period commences at 8 a.m. 

December 16 Fall Semester ends and Christmas Recess commences at nooi- 

December 17 Dormitories closed at noon 

January 2 Dormitories reopen at 8 a.m. 

January 3 \V'inter Term commences at 8 a.m. 

January 31 Winter Term ends 

Februarv 2 Spring Semester commences at 8 a.m. 

March 13-16 Mid-Semester examination period 

March 17 Spring recess commences at noon, dormitories closed 

March 24 Dormitories reopen at 8 a.m. 

March 25 Spring recess ends and classes begin at 8 a.m. 

.\pril 12 Good Friday; no classes 

.\pril 18 Meeting of Board of Trustees 

May 23 Spring Semester examination period commences at 8 a.m 

Mav 31 Spring Semester ends 

June 2 Baccalaureate 

June 2 Meeting of Board of Trustees 

June 3 Conuncnccment 

Dormitories closed at 10 p.m. 

June 24-.'\ugust 3 Sunmier School 




71 



\ 



\»"^ 



Scholarships 







Albert F. and Katharine F. Lang Scholarship 

Robert Hamilton Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. McMillan Scholarship Fund 

R. A. Ritter Scholarship 

J. J. Williams Scholarship 

Paul H. and Grace T. Creswell Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Carl Peter Damm Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Emily A. and Albert W. Mathison Scholarship 

The E. M. Reynolds Co., Inc. Scholarship 

William A. Rutherford Scholarship 

George C. and Wesley H. Morrow Scholarship Fund 

A. Franklin Green Scholarship 

Herbert and Gertrude Halverstadt Foundation Scholarship 

William G. and Marie Selby Foundation Scholarship 

Mrs. Frederick Leighton Scholarship Fund 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Smith Scholarship 

Cecil V. Butler Scholarship 

Milton Roy Sheen Memorial Scholarship 

The John E. Bryan Memorial Scholarship Fund 

The Rev. Silas E. Parsons, D.D., Scholarship 

Jarvis E. Baker Scholarship 

Helen C. and Myron G. Gibbons Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kirk Scholarship 

George A. Luger Scholarship 

Dr. Robert H. McCaslin Memorial Scholarship 

Frances Moss Carroll Scholarship 

Alfred McKethan Scholarship 

Mrs. R. R. Spiller Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Strickler Scholarship 

Charles Creighton Scholarship 

John E. Bryan Scholarship Fund 

College Honor Scholarships 

College Achievement Scholarships 

Charter Alumni Scholarship 

Hope Presbyterian Church, Winter Haven, Scholarship 



72 




Anonymous Scholarship Fund 

First Bank of Dunedin Scholarship 

^V'omen of the Church, Granville Presbytery, Synod ol North (Ian 
Scholarship 

^Vomen of the Church, First Presbyterian, St. Petersburg, Schohii> 

Women of the Church, First Presbyterian, Quincy, Scholarship 

First Presbyterian Church of St. Petersburg, Scholarship 

Westminster United Presbyterian Church, St. Petersburg, Scholar 
(Cuban Relief) 

First Presbyterian Church, Orlando, Scholarship 

National Merit Scholarship Corp. 

Junior Civitan Club, Fort Lauderdale High School Scholarship 

Lakeview Presbyterian Church, St. Petersburg, Two Scholarships 

St. Petersburg Beach Lions Club Scholarship 

Chapter AB-P.E.O. Sisterhood Scholarship 

Ira and Jean Morris Scholarship 



shij) 



Loans 



Mary and Frances Moss Student Loan Fund 

Frank K. Smith Memorial Loan Fund 

R. V. Wick Loan Fund 

Martha Mann Murphy Loan Fund 

John B. Turner Loan Fund 

Gene Samuel Cain Short Term Loan Fund 

Lawrence Wick Short Term Loan Fund 

Norman Michaelson Loan Fund 

L. Allen Morris Scholarship Loan Fimd 

Student Loan Fund 

Faculty and Administrative Staff Scholarship 

William Bell lippetls Mcin(;riai Loan Fund 

Lewis C. Tenney Memorial Loan Fund 

Eunice D. and Elmer L. Lawlcv S( hojaiship Fund 

Bonnie Heath Family Fund 

William G. and Marie Sclby I'ound.nion Loan Fund 



/ 



/! 



\\ 



73 



Resume 



The basic goal of the quality, liberal arts 
education offered at Florida Presbyterian College 
is to open new horizons to its students. Its 
emphasis is on growth and individual attainment. 
It endeavors, in every aspect, to encourage 
creative action and the power of decision on the 
basis of informed and thoughtful judgment, 
consciously pursued. The young men and women 
who attend this college must possess an eagerness 
to learn, a desire to grow physically, intellectually 
and spiritually, and have a willingness to accept 
much of the responsibility for their own learning. 

Florida Presbyterian College has a deep con- 
cern for its students and seeks in every way 
through its faculty and facilities to stimulate 
the realization of individual potential and to 
inculcate the seriousness of the student's voca- 
tion. In the guidance of student development, 
the college encourages its students, as subjects 
of tne learning process, to be emotionally inde- 
pendent, to think for themselves, to exercise as 
citizens of a democratic society their right and 
duty of personal judgment. As individuals, the 
students are challenged to have the strength to 
stand in solitary responsibility lest they become 
molded into personalities without purpose or 
identity which reflect only the wishes of others 
and who change with every new prevailing cir- 
cumstance. It plans to confront them with the 
conflicts of culture and to arouse within them 
the feelings of anxiety that should intensify their 
search for meaningful and applicable values and 
aid them in evolving an understanding of them- 
selves and their studies in relation to culture, 
creation and the Ultimate. 

As a Christian institution of higher learning, 
Florida Presbyterian College acknowledges as its 
primary search "the knowledge of God and 
knowledge of ourselves as revealed in Jesus 
Christ." It purposes to nurture the beliefs and 
attitudes that are central to the Christian inter- 
pretation of man, to employ faith as a probing 
and vitalizing force and not as a substitute for 
mental lethargy, and to inspire a strong sense 
of Christian moral obligation for involvement 
and leadership in local and global events. 



74 



Florida Presbyterian College maintains a 
unified academic connnunity in which each mem- 
ber's recognition and security depends on the 
pursuit and attainment of scholarly interests 
and Christian relationshijjs. Here learning is 
regarded as personal because of the realization 
that knowledge comes through others . . . of 
differing as well as similar backgioiuuis and 
pursuits. All methods for the establishment of 
truth in every aspect of life are employed to 
provide insights and skill which train and' excite 
the intellect and emotions for creative and 
imaginative expression. Freedom of thought is 
cherished, unlettered by arrogant assertions of 
opinion and pious devotion to blind tradition. 
It fosters a setting in which the respect for human 
dignity and the firmness in exercising moral re- 
sponsibility is supported by the belief that 
humanity was created by God for one great 
cooperation. 



• t 




75 




St. Petersburg^ Florida